courage

A Real-Life Hero

By Gaia Thurston-Shaine My hero is that woman who plays marimba with flying wrists, who opens her mouth in wild love for the music as she dances behind her instrument. My hero is one with gentle hands, who teaches Aikido by example and with the willingness to make a thousand mistakes for the sake of learning. My hero is the man who pulls the oars with skill, and who knows what to risk for the sake of fun and what is better left alone to admire. My hero is the woman who walks beside a field and exclaims at its beauty, then walks in the mountains and stands in awe. My hero dances madly, listens carefully, knows his strength, and see beauty in everything around him.

The dictionary definition of hero leaves much open for interpretation. None of the qualities I see as heroic are remotely similar to those honored in the tale of Beowulf, which I recently read. If an old English hero danced madly, took time to listen, decided something was too much for him to handle, or stopped to smell a flower, his reputation would be shot. Courage was seen as strength and perseverance in gaining power by force. I belleve it takes a much greater amount of courage and personal integrity to make mistakes, hug trees, look ridiculous, and truly Iisten.

Of all the people I've met, Thich Nhat Hanh comes the closest to having all these qualities. When I walk slowly beside him, his hand is gentle in mine. He stops to admire the sky or a view of the rolling French countryside. He teaches by experience, and has gained wisdom and insight by truly Ilstening to many kinds of people. I often wonder if he finds the same release through his sitting meditation as I do in the mountains or on the dance floor.

Every quality I see as heroic is one I constantly strive for in myself. I thrive on being gentle, listening, and walking with those I love. I balance gentleness with wild abandon, flying down a sledding hill headfirst or diving into an icecold glacial pool. I work hard to strengthen my abilities and do my best at everything I try, but also to accept my own mistakes. Perhaps some day I will become the hero I see in those around me-dancing wildly, listening closely, pulling the oars with confidence and respect, and seeing beauty in every landscape and human I encounter.

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Gaia Thurston-Shaine, a high school senior, lives in McCarthy, Alaska, and Port Townsend, Washington. She has attended many retreats with Thich Nhat Hanh and cocoordinated the teenagers' program during the 1997 retreat at Omega.

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"Strike against Terror" is a Misleading Expression

Terror is in the human heart. We must remove this terror from the heart. Destroying thehuman heart, both physically and psychologically, is what we should avoid. The root of terrorism should be identified so that it can be removed. The root of terrorism is misunderstanding, hatred and violence. This root cannot be located by the military. Bombs and missiles cannot reach it, let alone destroy it. Only with the practice of calming and looking deeply can our insight reveal and identify this root. Only with the practice of deep listening, restoring communication and compassion can it be transformed and removed.

Darkness cannot be dissipated with more darkness. More darkness will make darkness thicker. Only light can dissipate darkness. Violence and hatred cannot be removed with violence and hatred. Rather, this will make violence and hatred grow a thousandfold. Only understanding and compassion can dissolve violence and hatred. "Strike against terror" is a misleading expression. What we are striking against is not the real cause or the root of terror. The object of our strike is still human life. We are sowing seeds of violence as we strike. Striking in this way we will only bring more hatred and violence into the world. This is exactly what we do not want to do.

Hatred and violence are in the hearts of human beings. A terrorist is a human being with hatred, violence and misunderstanding in his or her heart. Acting without understanding, acting out of hatred, violence and fear, we help sow more terror, bringing terror to the homes of others and bringing terror back to our own homes. Whole societies are living constantly in fear with our nerves being attacked day and night. This is the greatest casualty we may suffer from as a result of our wrong thinking and action. Such a state of confusion, fear and anxiety is extremely dangerous. It can bring about another world war, this time extremely destructive.

We must learn to speak out so that the voice of the Buddha can be heard in this dangerous and pivotal moment of history. Those of us who have the light should display the light and offer it so that the world will not sink into total darkness. Everyone has the seed of awakening and insight within his or her heart. Let us help each other touch these seeds in ourselves so that everyone could have the courage to speak out. We must ensure that the way we live our daily lives (with or without mindful consumption, with or without discrimination, with or without participating in injustice) does not create more terrorism in the world. We need a collective awakening to stop this course of self-destruction.

The True Dharma Talk

By Ethan Pollock mb60-True1

Maybe I should be able to relate to people in other age groups as easily as to people my own age (mid-twenties). However, I have discovered that the Wake Up London Sangha has allowed me to open up in many new ways. Meditating with the Heart of London showed me the power of collective practice—the peace and solidity that comes when you practice with forty other people in the heart of a chaotic city. But I think it was joining the Wake Up London Sangha that really began to show me the true power of belonging to a Sangha.

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After the Wake Up meetings, I began to overcome my shyness and stay behind to chat with the other members. In the meals we shared, I discovered a new way to be with others—peacefully and calmly. The need to constantly make jokes, correct others, and debate opinions relaxed because of our afternoon of mindfulness, and we could just enjoy each other in a very simple way. It felt very beautiful.

As I have gotten to know the other Wake Up Londoners, I’ve also been able to learn from them—not just from their insights in our sharing sessions, but from how they are: the energy they put into being truly present, being kind, and creating beautiful spaces for mindfulness to flourish. To see how other people my age are living the practice—that feels like the true Dharma talk!

Maybe the most powerful part of our afternoons has been the sharing. I find sharing difficult. To explain how difficult, let me tell you that the first few times I came to the Sangha I even lied about my “weather report.” I still find it difficult to let people know if I’m having a bad day. However, our Wake Up group is quite small, and the intimacy of our Sangha makes it much easier for me to share from the heart. The atmosphere of peace and openness gave me the courage to share for the very first time. I was very fearful, and I still get nervous every time I share. It takes a lot of plucking up of courage before I bow in. I’m often surprised to hear emotion in my voice over what I had thought would be an easy sharing. Afterwards I feel the adrenaline coursing round my body. It takes a lot of breathing to calm my body down again.

To begin opening up has been a very powerful part of this practice for me. I had learnt from my family to keep my difficulties inside, to be self-contained. During my childhood I was bullied for many years and I still carry around that fear of attack, the fear that inside there is something unlovable or ridiculous, the feeling that to be accepted I need to hide certain parts of myself from others.

Every time I share from the heart I feel vulnerable, but to be listened to in kindness and acceptance has been very healing for me. I know I have developed much more openness, thanks to this practice. Every time another Sangha member shares from the heart I am humbled by their courage and generosity. I learn so much from them, am consoled at shared challenges, and encouraged by their attitudes and practice. It reminds me constantly what a precious gift it is to have an open heart, and how much we can benefit from each other when we are able to communicate freely, with love and understanding.

My heartfelt thanks to all my friends at Wake Up London who have created this beautiful space, and to the people in the Heart of London Sangha who make our meetings possible.

mb60-True2Ethan Pollock is part of the Wake Up London Sangha and has been practising mindfulness for two years. He is an artist, which is a job that makes minimum wage look like the wealth of King Midas, but he is pretty sure Midas didn’t have as much fun. He also enjoys reading too many books.

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