Parallax Press

World Wide Web of Mindfulness

By Allan Hunt Badiner mb16-World

The conversation started by the Buddha, and carried on by the arhats, pratyekabuddhas, and great teachers like Thich Nhat Hanh is continuing in the form of digital impulses crisscrossing the Earth, reaching into bulletin boards, downloading sutras, and conducting Dharma discussions via email. An entire world of Cyberbuddhism has manifested in the ether, with a population that is growing wildly. And while the jury may still be out on whether ultimately the electronic Buddhist world is a distraction or the possibility of a whole new level of experiencing Dharma, mindfulness practice in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh is now among the many Buddhist sites being served on the web.

While we were on pilgrimage with Thay in China last summer, Arnie Kotler took note of my enthusiasm for the potential of the web, and we discussed the possibility of creating an interactive website and online bookstore for Parallax Press. Over the past six months I have worked with a team of artists and programmers, notably Jay Cheroske and Jacqueline Neuwirth, to build a "mindful" corner on the web. In June, at the American Booksellers Association conference in Chicago, Parallax Press will launch the web's first contemplative, full-service online bookstore, which will offer all of its books, audio and video tapes, gifts and meditation supplies, in an environment secure for financial transactions. The URL (address) is http://www.parallax.org

Online customers can search or browse, enjoy slideshows of book covers and photos of Thay and Plum Village, tables of contents, sample chapters, and in the atmosphere of a bookstore. Purchases will be shipped within two days of ordering. The site also includes a fully searchable listing of local bookstores in the United States.

The Parallax Press web site also includes the activities of the worldwide Sangha, including a Sangha directory, retreat schedules, and also homes page for Plum Village and the Community of Mindful Living. The online bookstore will be particularly valuable to people around the world who are not close to bookstores that carry Thay's books. Visitors will be greeted by a bell of mindfulness and a guided meditation by Thay.

Dharma digirati and the just plain curious now have access to a voluminous serving of data and discussion, all lending credence to the idea that Buddhism will not be immune to the virtual explosion of human microprocessing power that is rapidly transforming our lives. The web will not be immune to the mindfulness revolution either. Please enjoy your visit to Parallax Press on the worldwide web, and remember to enjoy your breathing.

Allan Hunt Badiner, the editor of Dharma Gaia: A Harvest of Essays in Buddhism and Ecology, created the Parallax Press web site.

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From Sister Chan Khong

Editor's Note: In the following two letters, Sister Chan Khong shares some ideas about implementing Thay's vision of a unified Sangha and invites the input of the larger Sangha to help determine how this vision might be realized. Some of the advisory boards have already begun their work, but many other ideas-such as widespread use of the CML name and the establishment of a group tax exemption-have not been implemented, pending input from the Sangha and consideration of applicable law. We welcome input from the entire Sangha about these proposals.

March 31, 1999

Dear Friends,

In his Dharma Talk, Thay sets forth his vision for an inclusive and unified community. In 1974, while the war raged in Vietnam and Thay and I were exiled and living in Paris, Thay wrote his book, Zen Keys. In this book, Thay asked the question, "Is Awakening Possible?" He answered it as follows:

The problem that faces us is the problem of awakening. What we lack is not an ideology or a doctrine that will save the world. What we lack is mindfulness of what we are, of what our situation really is. We need to wake up in order to rediscover our human sovereignty. We are riding a horse that is running out of control. The way of salvation is a new culture in which human beings are encouraged to rediscover their deepest nature.

The first phase of this civilization must be to establish social conditions in which life can be lived in a human way. "Awakened" people are certainly going to form small communities where their material life will be simple and healthy, and time and energy will be devoted to spiritual concerns. These communities of mindful living will be like Zen monasteries with no dogma. In them, the sickness of the times will be cured and spiritual health will be renewed. Great art and thought will be produced.

The day following Thay's Dharma Talk at Plum Village, a transcription of which is enclosed, the then-board of Community of Mindful Living, inspired by Thay's vision of community inclusiveness, voted to add four monastic members to the CML Board. Thereafter, all of the nine board members of CML voted to merge CML into the Unified Buddhist Church, creating one inclusive, unified organization for our community. There were some difficulties in the process of merging, but with efforts made by everyone the good decision was ftnally achieved. The vote was unanimous.

Innovations

Inspired by the successes and innovations of numerous members of our community in bringing mindfulness practice to our society and in response to many suggestions of the Sangha, the following organizational modifications to our community are being proposed. The overall goal is to create a mindful organization that is integrated, easily understood by its members, an organization that encourages and realizes broad-based participation and a feeling of welcome, that defines the different roles and functions in the organization, and that applies consistent procedures and standards throughout all levels of our community.

Plum Village Example

It has been proposed by the Sangha that we all apply the practices used in Plum Village to all parts of the community. For example, we may consider, as Thay explains in his talk, that seniority in the monastic community is not a matter of number of years, but in time spent in defined practice sessions, for monastics, the winter retreat. Thay suggests that seniority in the lay community be viewed in this light also. Another practice used in Plum Village, which has been suggested be used in the lay community, is the use of guidance and Sangha Eyes. This is an important part of the community life here in Plum Village, and all of the Sanghas can beneftt from this practice. There are many other practices and innovations developed here at Plum Village that we would like to encourage members of all parts of the community to explore and use.

Different Elements of the Community

Sanghas or Local CML Chapters. As early as 1974, in Zen Keys, Thay was using the name Community of Mindful Living to describe the future practice communities he envisioned. It has been suggested that all local Sanghas could add the name Community of Mindful Living (CML) to their existing names. As an example, the existing Lotus Bud Sangha of Sydney Australia could now be called the Community of Mindful Living-Lotus Bud Sangha. If all Sanghas use the name, Community of Mindful Living, we become a family sharing a common name. By using the same name, CML, all Sanghas could be easily identifted, and anyone searching in the phone book, on the Internet, or in a Dharma directory, could ftnd the local CML Sangha chapter easily.

The name Community of Mindful Living is now available for all of our Sanghas to use. Also, we are applying through the Unifted Buddhist Church for recognition of an IRS taxdeductible group exemption. Each CML Sangha may beneftt from being able to receive tax-deductible donations, making sales-tax-free purchases, etc., using UBC's tax exempt status.

It has been suggested that we encourage the creation of regional counsels of CML Sanghas so that we can have more participation and support each other. It is also suggested that a board of advisors be established to encourage and assist the growth of CML Sanghas. It is proposed that the initial board of advisors be: Therese Fitzgerald-USA, Anh Huong Nguyen-USA, Br. Phap An-Plum Village, Lyn Fine-USA, Chan Huy-Canada, and LeVan Khanh Chan Truyen-Australia.

Order of Interbeing.

It has been suggested that the Order of Interbeing also have a board of advisors. The Order of Interbeing board of advisors, among other responsibilities, would deal with membership applications, review membership in good standing, and consider ways to nurture the growth of the Order of Interbeing. The Order of Interbeing board of advisors suggested for the first year is: Jack Lawlor-USA, Mitchell Ratner-USA, Larry Ward-USA, Terry Barber-USA, Sister Thoai Nghiem-Plum Village, Karl Riedl-Germany, Francoise Pottier-The Netherlands, Ha Vinh Tho-Switzerland, Elisabeth Ollagnier-France, and Chan Luong-Australia.

Dharma Teachers.

It has been suggested that a board of advisors be established to assist Dharma teachers. This advisory board would support Dharma teachers in their quality of practice, Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings, and practice retreats. The board of advisors suggested for the ftrst year is: Sister Annabel-(GMDC) USA, Chan Hoi-Canada, Thay Giac Thanh-(MFM) USA, and Karl Schmied-Germany.

Mindfulness Bell.

Thay envisions this publication becoming a worldwide Buddhist magazine with all parts of the community, Dharma centers, monasteries, CML Sanghas, mindfulness practice centers, mindfulness training institutions, laypeople, and monastics all contributing their insight and understanding. It is envisioned as an edited collection of articles written by and about all the different parts of the community and the Dharma and being a catalyst to create great art and thought, as Thay discussed in Zen Keys.

This publication, now edited by Leslie Rawls, could become an even more vibrant aspect of our community, and all members are encouraged to write and their submitted work is welcome. The board of advisors for the ftrst year is suggested to be: Richard Brady-USA, Jerry Braza-USA, Helga Riedl-Germany, Sister Jina-Plum Village, Ann Johnston-USA, Hoang Khoi-Australia, Mai Chan My-United Kingdom, and Eveline Beumkes-Holland.

Parallax Press.

Headed by Arnie Kotler, Parallax Press will now have all our book publishing operations, both national and international, under its direction. It will also be expanded to include not only publishing but also all marketing of the intellectual property rights to Thay's works recently transferred to the ownership of the UBC. We envision this Press as a strong, growing institution of our community. Its board of advisors, suggested for the fIrst year, is: Michael Rosenbush-France, Sister Huong Nghiem-GMDC, Sister Thuc Nghiem-GMDC, and Nguyen Ba Thu Chan Tri-USA.

Central Communication System.

Using the existing CML webpage and a new 1-800 number, we would like to establish a comprehensive directory system for all CML Sanghas, Green Mountain Dharma Center, Mindfulness Practice Centers, the UnifIed Buddhist Church, Parallax Press, Plum Village, Maple Forest Monastery, Maple Village, The Mindfulness Bell, etc.

Future Years

The members of these advisory boards are unpaid volunteers. Of course, the paid staff employees of the various parts of the community, such as Parallax Press, The Mindfulness Bell, and the Order of Interbeing will have significant input into the decision-making process.

The above advisory board members are to be nominated for the fIrst year only. After the fIrst year, the community itself will decide whom to have on its boards of advisors. The entire community will be consulted by using the combination of democracy and seniorship outlined by Thay.

These proposed organizational innovations are inspired by Thay's recent Dharma Talk and will bring in many new voices to the decision-making processes of our community. All of us, as individual drops of water, are joining together as one river flowing to the sea.

Yours in the Dharma, Sister Chan Khong

Plum Village, the 250th day before the year 2000. April26, 1999

Dear friends,

Thay is very happy that the invitation of more participants and input contained in my letter of April 4, 1999 to all of you has borne fruit. We welcome and are grateful for your suggestions made over the past few weeks. The receipt of these contributions has encouraged us improve even more energetically on the path of broad based community decision making.

Thay is a generous teacher who has offered his guidance on how our community should be organized so that everyone may feel included and that his or her contribution is valued. Thay always listens to his Sangha. Together, we can carefully consider matters and our collective insight will bring forth well being of the entire Sangha.

We have proposed thirty members to be advisors. Initially. these advisors were chosen to give the broadest representation geographically from many continents and countries. speaking many languages and including laymen, laywomen, nuns, and monks. We are looking forward to expanding this core group over the next twelve months as the community determines. We wish that the various boards of advisors for The Mindfulness Bell, the Order Of Interbeing, Parallax Press, and CML will soon start to make plans to meet and discuss how to give more inspiration and encouragement to each part of the Sangha Body.Please do not wait, go ahead as a Sangha to discuss and to give new fresh air to that part of the Sangha where we suggested you put your energy. Even if your name is not on the board of advisors of that branch of the Sangha body, just contact those on the board and give your insight. We are listening carefully to the advice of our Sangha members who are attorneys about tax exemption at the local level, and will consider with you again before acting. Thank you.

We are pleased to inform you that as I write this letter, the board of advisors for Parallax Press has traveled to and has already spent many days in Berkeley, to work with Arnie and the staff of Parallax Press. Thay is very happy that so many members of the community are now contributing and that his students feel encouraged to contribute even more. With the maturity of practice and spiritual growth of so many of his lay students, Thay has decided that soon he will transmit the Lamp to many new lay Dharma teachers.

We need your input and help to make a True Sangha Body. We write to you with love and trust in the deep insights of the stream of our spiritual teachers existing in each of you and we wait to hear from you.

We believe strongly that this merger of two arms of Thay in the United States of America (UBC and CML) and the enlarging of the Sangha Body is the will of our spiritual ancestors but not from Thay only.When conditions are sufficient, where the merits of those who have received and who will receive this teaching are sufficient, deep energies push and things should be realized have been realized without premeditating. It comes out finally and helps everyone go in the direction of beauty.

Please continue to share your wisdom with us.

A wonderful green spring to you, a renewed fresh Sangha member,

Chan Khong True Emptiness Bare Feet

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International Mindfulness Network

A Message from Thich Nhat HanhNovember 2 , 1999 Plum Village, France

Sharing a Practice

Twelve years ago, at a retreat in Montreal, a lady told me after the first session of walking meditation practice, "Thay, it is wonderful to walk this way. I have never felt relaxed and happy like this before when I walked. Would you allow me to share this practice of mindful walking with my friends at home?" I looked at her and smiled: "Why not?" It is wonderful to share your practice with others, when the practice brings you joy and well-being. We should be able to share the Dharma, and by doing so, we build a Sangha, a community of practice. When we have a Sangha, we have a refuge, and many others will also profit from that Sangha. Sharing the practice can be a great joy. It helps other people. And it helps us. Naturally we want to learn more, and to practice more in order to be able to share more.

The Meaning of "Lamp Transmission"

The Dharma can be transmitted continuously in each moment of the day. By practicing, the teachers and the sisters and brothers in the Dharma are already transmitting the Dharma every minute of their life. Very often the Dharma is transmitted without verbal expressions. We do not need an "authorization" to share the Dharma. The "Lamp Transmission" Ceremony performed in Plum Village is not an authorization to teach the Dharma; it is only an encouragement, a support, and an empowerment.

Sangha-Building

If you have joined in one or more retreats of mindfulness practice, you may like to organize and lead a Day of Mindfulness or a small retreat by yourselves or with other experienced practitioners in order to share the Dharma, and to practice with others. And you may like to receive further training or attend other retreats of mindfulness to learn more, to improve the quality of your practice and your skills in organizing and leading a retreat.

Organizing a retreat and practicing with others is a wonderful way to build a Sangha. Sangha-building is the noblest thing for us to do. Everyone needs a Sangha to continue and get support for his/her practice. Without a Sangha, one can abandon one's practice after a few months of practicing alone. The Sangha is like a boat carrying us and preventing us from sinking into the river of suffering, because the Sangha contains also the Buddha and the Dharma.

The Five Mindfulness Trainings are also powerful tools for Sangha-building. The Five Trainings are the most concrete expression of the practice. They are the basis for individual and collective transformation and healing. Everyone in the Sangha should be encouraged to receive the Five Trainings and bring them into his or her daily life. On Days of Mindfulness and in mindfulness retreats, it is beneficial to recite the Five Trainings and to organize Dharma discussion to deepen our understanding of the Trainings and to help us know how to apply them better.

True practice can bring a lot of relief and joy and nourishment. Suppose your Sangha has fifteen members and you would like to call it by a name, like Lotus Seeds Sangha. You may like to use a letterhead with the following: Lotus Seeds Sangha A Community of Mindful Living Address Phone Number/Fax/Email

Communities of Mindful Living Network 

There will soon be thousands of Communities of Mindful Living like yours in many countries, and people who live in your area may find you and join your Sangha through the Internet or through The Mindfulness Bell magazine. What characterizes a Community of Mindful Living or a Mindfulness Practice Center is the practice of the Five Mindfulness Trainings. We cannot call our community a Community of Mindful Living or a Mindfulness Practice Center if we do not live according to the Five Mindfulness Trainings.

The Mindfulness Bell magazine will continue to be a great support for Sangha-building, sharing information about the practice and the worldwide Sangha.

From time to time you may like to co-organize a larger retreat with other Communities of Mindful Living in your region. You may like to invite a Dharma Teacher through the Communities of Mindful Living Network, because there is now a Coordinating Council of the Communities of Mindful Living. The Council has an office in Albany, California, and you can contact the office in order to seek help with planning, materials, training, information, teachers, and other matters.

We have opened a new Dharma door called a Mindfulness Practice Center to introduce the practice to as many people as possible in a nonsectarian manner. You may want to contact the Mindfulness Practice Center Association and explore initiating a Mindfulness Practice Center in your city, institution, or workplace.

The Order of Interbeing

If you are an ordained member of the Order of Interbeing, your task is to build a Sangha and support the practice of the Sangha. Your Sangha can be called a Community of Mindful Living. Those of us who have formally received the Fourteen Trainings are members of the Core Community of the Order of Interbeing, and all others are members of the extended community of the Order. You may like to invite everyone in your Sangha to come and participate in the recitation ceremony of the Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings. Members of the Core Community of the Order of Interbeing are expected to keep sixty days of mindfulness a year, be active in Sangha-building and organizing Days of Mindfulness and mindfulness retreats.

There will soon be a Council of the Order of Interbeing forming in each country or region. We may get in touch with this Council to get the support we need. The dates for Days of Mindfulness and retreats can be set up one year in advance, and practitioners can have access to this information through the Internet or The Mindfulness Bell magazine.

The Institute of Mindfulness Training located at Green Mountain Dharma Center in Vermont is a place where we can receive more intensive training in the practice of mindfulness. The Head of the Institute is Sister Annabel Laity, Abbess of the Green Mountain Dharma Center.

Parallax Press

Parallax Press will continue to be the primary publisher and distributor of Thay's books and of other books on socially engaged Buddhism. My hope is that Parallax Press will lead the way in showing others how our practice and our work lives can be integrated, that Parallax Press will succeed in being both financially viable and a center of practice.

The Unified Buddhist Church

The Unified Buddhist Church (UBC) was founded by Thay in 1971 to serve as the legal and financial entity behind Dharma projects such as the Vietnamese Buddhist Peace Delegation (1971-76), Sweet Potatoes Community (1976-82), the boat people rescue project (1976-1989), Plum Village (1982-Present), and the organization of retreats in Europe, Asia, and Australia (1983-Present). In 1998, the UBC was incorporated as a church in the United States to provide a focus for the expanding network of Dharma projects, such as the Green Mountain Dharma Center, Parallax Press, and the Communities of Mindful Living. The UBC is guided by a Board of Directors that include Thay, monastics, and a lay Dharmacarya.


The following names and addresses may be useful:

Unified Buddhist Church Board The Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh (Plum Village) Sister Chan Khong (Plum Village, New Hamlet) Brother Phap An (Plum Village, Upper Hamlet) Sister Thoai Nghiem (Plum Village, Lower Hamlet) Sr. Chan Due, Annabel Laity (Green Mountain Dharma Center) Sr. Thuc Nghiem, Susan (Green Mountain Dharma Center) Dharmacarya Anh-Huong Nguyen (MPC of Fairfax, Virginia)

Plum Village—New Hamlet Martineau 13, 33580 Dieulivol, France Tel:(33)5 5661 8418 or (33)5 5661 6688 Fax:(33)5 5661 6151

Plum Village—Lower Hamlet Meyrac, 47120 Loubes Bernac, France

Plum Village-Upper Hamlet Lepey, 24240 Thenac, France

Green Mountain Dharma Center and Maple Forest Monastery P.O. Box 182 Hartland-Four Corners, Vermont 05049, USA Tel:(802)436-1103; Fax:(802)436-1101

Coordinating Council of the Communities of Mindful Living (For information about local Sanghas, The Mindfulness Bell, the Order of Interbeing, and Mindfulness Practice Centers) P.O. Box 7355, Berkeley, CA 94707, USA Tel:(510) 527-3710; Fax:(510)525-7129

Parallax Press P.O. Box 7355, Berkeley, CA 94707, USA Tel:(800)863-5290 (Book orders); (510)525-0101 (Other calls) Fax:(510)525-7129; email:parapress@aol.com

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