Five Contemplations

No-Bake Prison Brownies

By Ricky mb44-Nobake1

Ingredients

20-24 cookies (any small chocolate cookie with a vanilla or chocolate icing in the middle, such as Oreo, Chocolate Crème, or Double Fudge) 1 Hershey Bar (plain or with almonds) Chocolate syrup

Preparation

  1. Separate the icing from the middle of the cookies and put it in a small bowl. You will need it later.
  2. In a mixing bowl crush the cookies as finely as possible.
  3. In the same mixing bowl break the Hershey Bar into small pieces. Stir the candy bar and cookies together.
  4. Add chocolate syrup (a little bit at a time) to the mixture and stir evenly. To thoroughly blend contents, use a spoon and press the mixture down into the bowl. There should be enough chocolate syrup so that when you roll the mixture into a ball it holds together without being too wet.
  5. With the mixture rolled into a ball, form the brownie into a small cereal bowl.
  6. Set the bowl on a fluorescent light or another warm surface for 2-3 hours. This will heat the brownie and melt the chocolate chunks inside.
  7. Take the cookie icing and add a small amount of warm water (about a teaspoon) and stir thoroughly. You want the consistency of cake frosting. Spread evenly on top of the brownie.
  8. Enjoy!

Brownie Meditation

Let’s enjoy our brownie together.

Pick up the bowl and hold it in your hands. Take a nice long look at your brownie and smile. Take your time, we’re in no hurry.

Notice the color and texture of the icing. Smell it and notice the sweetness.

Now, cut out a small piece, or use a spoon and scoop out a little bite. Again, look at it and notice the colors and texture.

Do you see the chunks of chocolate inside? Let’s think about the chocolate for a minute.

Think about the cocoa beans that were used to make it. Maybe they grew in Brazil or Columbia. Think how the sun shined down on them, and the rain fell to help them grow. The earth nourished them from the roots so the beans would be just right.

Consider the farmer who picked the beans. He or she has a family and a village of people who know him, who know her, and because we have received these cocoa beans, we’re connected to them, too.

Imagine the boat that delivered the beans. Maybe they came by truck. Consider the driver. I wonder what his name was, what her name was.

What about the gas and oil the boat or truck used? Perhaps it came from Iraq or Saudi Arabia. That’s halfway around the planet from where we’re sitting right now.

Let’s think about the processing plant where the chocolate was made, and all the people who work there. Think about the sugar that was added to make the chocolate sweet and the milk from a cow somewhere.

Even the scientists who invented the preservatives to keep our cookies fresh in the package — they’re involved in this whole process, too.

It’s as if the entire cosmos has come together to provide us with this brownie that we’re enjoying. It was all done for our pleasure. We are connected to everything and everyone in this vast universe in which we exist. Let’s thank them all and smile.

Now, let’s take a bite. Just let it sit in our mouth for a few seconds before we begin to chew. Notice how our mouth begins to water as it receives the bite of brownie. Do you taste the chocolate or the icing first? Slowly begin to chew and notice how all the flavors blend together for our enjoyment. We can’t help but be grateful.

Continue to chew slowly until it completely dissolves, and then swallow.

As we take another bite, let’s wish happiness for ourselves. Let’s think about our body as it digests our brownie. Let’s thank our body for all the miracles that take place inside it every second of every day.

When we take our next bite, let’s offer it to all beings everywhere throughout this world and beyond. Let’s wish them all peace and happiness. We can continue to feel the interconnectedness and to hold that loving-kindness in our heart as we go about the rest of our day.

Truly, life is a precious gift. Deep bows to all.

Submitted by Terry Masters, True Action and Virtue, from Austin, Texas, where she leads a sangha at the Lockhart Community Justice Center. She writes, “Ricky is famous in the prison for his Prison Brownies. He brought some to our meditation the other day and I offered Thây’s eating meditation. I suggested he share the recipe. So the next week he brought the recipe — and the meditation he wrote.”

“Ricky experimented for years with the ingredients and the procedure for preparing and ‘cooking’ the brownies. The ingredients are hard to come by. Each prison has a concession; prisoners can work to earn a little bit of money at the prison — things like sweeping or cleaning the toilets — or their families can send them a little money. Inmates then must earn the right to visit the concession, which in some prisons is open only from 3 to 4 a.m. Ricky purchases all the ingredients for his brownies at the concession. He ‘cooks’ the brownies on the fluorescent lamp in his cell because that is, of course, his only source of heat. He says he adds love with each ingredient, with each step of the preparation. Then he shares generously.”

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Sangha News

mb48-SanghaNews1 Thay Rewrites the Five Contemplations

In view of the statistics showing that more greenhouse gases are produced by factory farming than any other single factor, Thay has changed the wording of the fourth of the Five Contemplations that we use as part of a mindful meal.

The Contemplations now read as follows:

This food is a gift of the earth, the sky, numerous living beings, and much hard work.

May we eat with mindfulness and gratitude so as to be worthy to receive it.

May we transform our unwholesome mental formations, especially our greed.

May we keep our compassion alive by eating in such a way that we reduce the suffering of living beings, preserve our planet, and reverse the process of global warming.

We accept this food so that we may nurture our sisterhood and brotherhood, strengthen our sangha and nourish our ideal of serving all beings.

Sister Annabel, True Virtue October 2007

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New Dharma Teachers Ordained at Plum Village

On January 9, 2008, Plum Village held a Grand Ordination Ceremony called Earth-Refreshing. The following lay Dharmacharyas received the Lamp Transmission from Thich Nhat Hanh:

  • Charles Al Lingo, True Seal of Virtue, U.S.A.
  • Cheryll Ann Maples, True Precious Mindfulness Trainings, U.S.A.
  • Eevi Elizabeth Beck, Practice of True Compassion, Norway
  • Ger Levert, True Ocean of Peace, The Netherlands
  • Seijja Mauro, True Jewel of Compassion, Finland

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Cheri Maples’ Gatha

Breathing in, I know that mindfulness is the path to peace. Breathing out, I know that peace is the path to mindfulness.

Breathing in, I know that peace is the path to justice. Breathing out, I know that justice is the path to peace.

Breathing in, I know my duty is to provide safety & protection to all beings. Breathing out, I am humbled and honored by my duty as a peace officer.

Breathing in, I choose mindfulness as my armor & compassion as my weapon. Breathing out, I aspire to bring love and understanding to all I serve.

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Q & A about Blue Cliff

During a recent visit to Blue Cliff Monastery, we had the opportunity to ask Brother Phap Vu some questions about the new practice center.

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Tell us what you know of the history of this place.

This was told to me by Corky Jeronimo, the former owner. The Jeronimo family lived in New York City, but during the 1940s there was a wave of anti-Cuban, anti-Latino sentiment and Corky’s parents decided to move out of the city. At that time the Catskills was a very popular place for city folk to escape to, especially on the weekend.

This was an existing farm — basically a house and a barn. The original house, in which Corky grew up, is still intact; we call it the Farmhouse. It shows up on late nineteenth-century maps, so it has to be at least a hundred years old. The original barn was eventually converted into the main building.

As the family settled in, relatives and friends would come up to visit. Eventually the parents decided to start a get-away resort. As time went on the various buildings were built, one at a time, then swimming pools and tennis courts.

Why did the Jeronimos decide to sell?

Most decisions there were several factors, including economics, but mostly they wanted to retire and unload a cow.

What did you do after you bought it?

We had to pour more money into it for some basic renovations such as the kitchen, laundry room, and Harmony Meditation Hall, which was an indoor swimming pool. In the main building we took out the bar and lounge for the main dining room. We renovated Jade Candle Meditation Hall to make it larger and added on a bathroom–shower block. We also did a little work on the Farmhouse, adding a bathroom and bedroom downstairs. We took an old barn down and built a storage building.

All of the rooms in all the buildings had large double or queen size beds as well as television. We had to get rid of the beds and the televisions. We started to get the word out in the local community that there were old beds and TVs to be had; not too many responded but eventually we got rid of them. In place we put bunk beds.

We also established trails in the forest with benches and bridges and a stone staircase for people to enjoy. We planted bushes and trees. We turned the outdoor swimming pool into a garden. Much of this needed to be done but we also did it in preparation for the big retreat with Thay [in October 2007].

Not only did we do all this but there were the basic maintenance issues — such as bathroom doors that didn’t close or didn’t lock. I trimmed about fifteen doors and changed close to twenty door knobs. I also repaired several toilets that needed parts; I had to rebuild two completely. Some roof work had to be done, some still need repairs. Some of the decking on the buildings was rotting and some of the beams and railings had to be replaced; they still need some more work. Two of the main water lines broke, one just before the October retreat.

What plans do you have for future work?

What future work — we’re broke!

In the monks’ residence we are currently converting the garage into a kitchen and adding on a dining hall. Mostly we will be looking to do some repair and renovation on the existing buildings; they certainly need it. Each building has its own issues that need to be addressed — you know, like sanghas. But with a little loving care... !

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Overall the buildings really need to be better insulated. The Jeronimos didn’t operate during the winter months so the buildings lose a lot of heat, which is very expensive in terms of fuel. We are beginning to look into green technologies and strategies to bring the cost down and help Mother Nature a bit. I do see that eventually we could turn to alternative energy sources, but one step at a time.

What is Thay’s vision for Blue Cliff Monastery?

Thay sees New York City as an acupuncture point for America and therefore wishes that the monastic sangha in BCM develop a strong practice in order to make that acupuncture point effective. This is why some of the older brothers and sisters have been brought in to support the practice. I think it is essential.

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mb48-SanghaNews7For this current year we are mostly concerned with building brotherhood and sisterhood here at BCM. This is a new territory for the monastics; in Plum Village the brothers’ hamlet and sisters’ hamlet are kilometers away. Even at Deer Park the hamlets are clearly separated, but this is not the case here. So we are learning how to be a more integrated community. It is really going to take a change in perspective. Think about it, we come from a tradition where for centuries monks and nuns are separated. Now we are here together. Formally, Thay has established two hamlets here: one for the brothers and one for the sisters. In actuality it comes down to two residences: one residence for the brothers and one residence for the sisters. This is due not to an idea of what a monastery is or isn’t or what it should be or what it shouldn’t be but to sheer practicality of the property.

mb48-SanghaNews8Geography plays an important role in forming societies and cultures. Here the question of what I am attached to is very relevant. More specifically, what perspectives, understandings, reactions, and decisions come out of that attachment? The teachings of the Madhyamaka school need to come forward — getting beyond categories and distinctions, little boxes that we sort the world of experience into and fool ourselves into thinking this is truth, this is happiness.

 

—Janelle Combelic, True Lotus Meditation

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A Gift Economy

By Zachiah Laurann Murray mb55-AGift1

Throw away holiness and wisdom and people will be a hundred times happier. Throw away morality and justice and people will do the right thing. Throw away industry and profit and there won’t be any thieves.

If these three aren’t enough, just stay at the center of the circle and allow all things to take their course.

--Tao Te Ching, A New English Version, Chapter 19 (translated by Stephen Mitchell)

“Each week we give all of our profits to Barbac, the owner of the Wise Cicada Health Food Store. When he has taken care of his financial obligations, he returns to us what he feels the cafe can offer,” says Susan Gribble, co-creator and visionary of the new Wise Cicada Cafe, located in New Market, New Zealand. “Then on gifting night,” she continues, “we place the money Barbac has offered us into the center of the circle on the floor, where we have come together, and each person takes according to his or her need.” She pauses. “It takes real trust.”

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On February 28, 2010, I had the honor and privilege of washing dishes on the cafe’s opening day, just before embarking on a silent walkabout in the bush of New Zealand. The cafe is the manifestation of a vision shared by Donna Murray, Susan Gribble, and Endel Araujo. Their vision is to create a cafe based on a new paradigm, one dedicated to living—actually embodying—a new way of being in the flow of commerce in today’s marketplace.

In a gift economy, no prices are placed upon the items being offered. One is asked to go beyond what physically appears on one’s plate or in one’s cup. One is asked to look deeply and mindfully into one’s entire experience—the love and hearts of those in service, the nourishment one receives, the beautiful atmosphere of the cafe, and all the beings, plants, and minerals, including the clouds, the rain, the soil, and the sun, that have contributed to making the food. Looking with the eyes of mindfulness, one is called to deeply acknowledge one’s complete interbeing with all of life. And from this inspired place of truth, one is asked to offer an authentic expression of one’s heart and understanding in gratitude for the gifts received.

This expression of gifting and gratitude shows faith in the truth of our oneness. The exchange is an embodiment of the wisdom of Thich Nhat Hanh’s teachings on interbeing. While the visionaries and co-creators of the cafe are not Buddhists, they have great insight into our need to see beyond the illusion of our separateness. Not only do they recognize our interbeing, but they have also dedicated their livelihood to this knowing. Their cafe gracefully reflects the beauty of our oneness with all of life and directly invites each of us to see with our Buddha eyes, to live from our Buddha hearts, and to fully express and realize our Buddha nature while actively engaged in our daily lives.

Through their being and presence, the co-creators of the cafe stand as a clear mirror of faith and trust, offering us the opportunity to acknowledge Thay’s teaching of interbeing through our own action; this action deeply waters the seed of truth in each of us. The mirror of truth stands before us; it is ours to look closely and not only know, but embody, its wisdom.

During a month-long silent walkabout in the bush of the Waitakere Ranges, I stayed down the hill from my friends’ retreat center and cafe. Each morning, very early, I went up the hill to the center. Sometimes when I arrived, they were preparing food for the cafe. I entered into their flow, silently joining them, and then slipped back into the bush and disappeared like a visiting bird. The love of this silent communion with my friends hummed its song within my heart as I spent time in solitude with nature.

My final day upon the sacred land—for certain, my second home—returned me to the familiar and welcoming arms and hearts of my friends at the Wise Cicada Cafe. Having ingested only protein shakes while in the bush to keep things simple and not attract animals, I was extremely grateful that my last nourishment in New Zealand would be the soul food offered by my friends. When I arrived on the morning of March 25, Endel served me as I carefully selected the beautiful foods that would fill my plate and my soul, foods prepared “with great love,” as Donna was often heard to say. I asked if I could partake of my meal before paying for it, that I might drink deeply of its offering. With a warm and easy smile, Endel granted me the opportunity to explore the fullness of my senses before making my financial offering.

I relished the food’s rich flavors and looked for all the life and energy within it. I realized I was embodying the sky, the clouds, the rain, the sun and its warmth. I was grateful to the hearts and hands of the beings, animals, plants, and minerals that had offered their life energy to this meal, and I let this truth resonate deeply within me. Enfolded, too, in this experience, were the love and hearts of my beloved friends. I wrapped their love in my heart cloth, and I will carry them with me wherever I go.

I realized no money could ever really recompense my friends for the gift I had received. I resolved to express its merit and truth through my life and through the extension of my own generosity and love. In each moment, as I observe the world, I stretch to see beyond my physical senses and to trust my inner vision and knowing—to see the sky, the clouds, and the sun in everything I meet—and from this awareness engage with the true presence around and in me.

Donna, Susan, and Endel have thrown away industry and profit, and in so doing have made room for the human heart in commerce. They have planted the seed of a different way of being within our economy, one that deeply acknowledges the one life we all inter-are. We are all nourished by their effort and their living message as they manifest this beautiful gift economy in New Zealand. May they and all beings prosper in the soil of this new vision.

For more information about the Wise Cicada Health Food Store and Cafe, visit www.wisecicada.co.nz.

mb55-AGift3Zachiah Laurann Murray, Pure Truth of the Heart, is a Registered Landscape Architect. The Heart Sangha of Santa Cruz, CA, is home for her practice.

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Walking the Green Path

Deer Park Monastery Takes Steps for Mother Earth  By Laura Hunter 

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BONG. BONG. Each morning when the temple bell sounds, we rise and walk silently and peacefully through the grounds of Deer Park Monastery. As we proceed among the centuries-old oaks and manzanitas, we pass large solar panel arrays, electric golf carts, composting units, and large food and native plant gardens. To walk at Deer Park Monastery is to walk on the green path in the direction of love for our Mother Earth.

Thay has called on all the world’s residents to “wake up” to the dangers of global warming and to take action to slow and reverse it. This message has resonated deeply with all of us at Deer Park, so the community has chosen a “green” path. By walking this path, we reduce our collective greenhouse gas emissions, live in closer harmony with nature, and more concretely honor the bodhisattva, Mother Earth.

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The residents and practitioners at Deer Park Monastery are taking many actions to serve as an example of how we can all lighten our steps and live in harmony with the Earth. We want to engage our practice by putting our compassion and mindfulness into action to improve society and our planet.

Mindful Eating mb63-Walking3

It is well documented that the meat industry, in addition to being inhumane to animals and un- healthful for people, is among the largest contributors to climate change. One of the easiest and most significant things we can do to reduce our carbon footprint is to reduce or eliminate consumption of dairy, eggs, and meat. Our community sees the connection between eating meat and carbon emissions, deforestation, starvation, pollution of the planet, and other preventable suffering. Deer Park residents eat a diet that is primarily vegan. We honor this commitment at every meal when we recite the Five Contemplations before our silent eating meditation. The Fourth Contemplation was updated to reflect the link between what we eat and how it impacts our planet:

May we eat in such a way as to keep our compassion alive, reduce the suffering of living beings, preserve our planet, and reverse the process of global warming.

Consuming simply and using mostly local foods, Deer Park cooks feed our community on approximately $3 per person each day. If you want to eat in such a way, we have gathered some of their recipes in a fourfold Sangha cookbook, Cooking with Deer Park in Heart and Mind, available at our bookshop.

The Sun as Our Heart 

We all have a heart inside, but we have heart outside of us, too—the sun. We see the energy of the sun keeping us alive and present everywhere—in our food, in our bodies, in the table, even in the pages of this magazine. At Deer Park, we have installed three large arrays that make up our 66-kilowatt photovoltaic system. This system produces almost 100% of all the electricity needed at the monastery. It is also very helpful to the local energy supply, as it produces clean power during peak power needs—the times when carbon-fueled power plants emit the most pollution. We estimate that 120 tons of carbon dioxide emissions are prevented every year due to our solar arrays. Using solar energy is one way that we lighten our steps on the planet.

Mindful Transportation 

At Deer Park, we have instituted a weekly Car-Free Day. On Tuesdays, no cars are driven at the monastery and residents do not ride in cars. We invited our worldwide community to join our Car-Free Day Campaign and received commitments of 100,000 car-free days a year from the global Sangha.

When we do drive, we try to combine trips and we do not go out simply to drive around. Our location on a steep hillside, with practice areas far apart, means that we need to move people throughout our monastery. To reduce our impact, we purchased two electric people-movers that are charged by solar panels.

Transforming Our Compost 

Our practice teaches us the benefit of transforming our spiritual compost. We see that the transformation of suffering can be a source of happiness. At Deer Park, we are taking it a step further. A local non-profit, Solana Center for Environmental Innovation, helped us by installing a large composting unit and offering guidance and support. Now we serve as a public composting demonstration site for San Diego County. Not only do we compost leftover food and scraps, we also turn them into food again in our gardens. We educate our Sangha, visitors, and the general public about the benefits of composting by engaging them directly in the practice after every meal.

Dharma Rain Gardening 

With so many wonderful teachers in residence, Deer Park “Dharma rain” falls often. However, due to our physical location in Southern California, the water-based rainfall is scarce. We have a plan for rainwater harvesting and we’ve dug berms, trenches, and ponds into the land to try to keep rainwater on-site and in the local groundwater basin. We practice stringent water conservation measures (installing water-free urinals and low-flow faucets) and have resurrected a local well for the majority of our water supply. Thus, we have reduced our reliance on imported water and our impact on the Colorado River. Wherever we can, we protect and encourage local native plants that are acclimated to low water conditions.

Building a Green Deer Park 

Deer Park is very lovely, but its buildings are old and worn. We are currently raising funds to build a new nunnery. This will be an eco-friendly building made of renewable straw bales, designed to be highly energy-efficient and powered by the sun. It will offer a healthy, safe home to forty sisters and a new living space for Thay. Our sisters will be a shining example of how we can live lightly and comfortably in community on the Earth.

Land Ancestors Offering 

At Deer Park, we have the opportunity to live close to the land. We see that we are the continuation of the land ancestors and our spiritual teachers. In our ceremonies, chants, and other practices, we try to keep in close touch with them. We keep our awareness alive through regular offerings to the land ancestors. In this way, we keep the Earth close to us and in our consciousness.

It is our sincere aspiration to live in harmony with this land, with all the vegetation and animals living here, and with all our brothers and sisters with whom we live and practice. When we are in harmony with each other, we are also in harmony with the land, with the plants and animals. We see our close relationship with every person and every species. The happiness and suffering of all humans and all other species are our own happiness and suffering. 

We inter-are. As practitioners, we see we are part of and not separate from the whole of human civilization. As human beings, we see that we are children of the Earth and not separate from the soil, the forests, rivers, and sky. We share the same destiny. We are aware that much harm has been done to the Earth out of ignorance, craving, and arrogance. As children of this land, we ask for your great compassion to forgive us for these shortcomings. Today we are determined to begin anew—to make all efforts, large and small, to collectively effect real change in our global ecological situation. We vow not to deplete the energy of the land and her resources with our careless actions, but rather to contribute to the regeneration of this beautiful land, bringing freshness, peace, and happiness to all who come here. Deer Park’s conversion to solar energy is one way that we lighten our steps on the Earth and truly arrive as responsible and loving children of the Earth. 

- Text of the Offering to the Land Ancestors on the occasion of the installation of the solar array at Deer Park Monastery, February 10, 2008 

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The Green Virtue of Laziness 

“Do something!” is often the activist cry. However, doing nothing can also be a great way to reduce our impact on the planet. At Deer Park, we enjoy a weekly Lazy Day, a day on which we cultivate not-doing. This is not a catch-up-on-chores or do-email day, but rather a time to do only what is nourishing to you in an unplanned manner—simply letting the day unfold as it will. A true lazy day does not involve driving or entertainment or other consumptive actions. If we can cultivate inner happiness, without need for outside resources, the Earth will also benefit. As Dharma teacher Thich Chan Phap Hai shared, “Laziness is one of the most important practices and medicines for our time and our situation.”

Preserving the Land for the Future 

In 2012, practitioners raised funds to protect the hillside west of the monastery under a protective easement in perpetuity. On March 17, we dedicated the Council Ridge trail, which can be used generation after generation to cultivate peace and freedom. We hope you can come and join us here.

Thich Nhat Hanh reminds us that our actions today will create our future. “We have to live in such a way that a future will be possible for our children and our grandchildren, and our own

life has to be our message. Let us do this now, together, to wake people up before it’s too late,” he said.

May we all look deeply into our situation and act to step more lightly on the Earth by walking the green path together.

This article was originally published in Buddhism and Culture. 

mb63-Walking5Laura Hunter, True Ocean of Teachings, lives in Escondido, California, with her husband Ron Forster and Dharma dog Sprout. She sits with the Really Beneficial Sangha, works for environmental justice, and is a board member of the Thich Nhat Hanh Foundation.

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