Letters to the Mindfulness Bell

I was first drawn to Thich Nhat Hanh’s teaching during the Gulf War when a friend gave me Peace Is Every Step. I felt open to the truth of his words because of his work with veterans and because of what he suffered in Vietnam. I felt that if he could make peace in the midst of that fire, I ought to be able to make a little peace in my own life. I continue to draw benefits from the mindfulness retreats I have attended at Omega, and I look forward to more. I feel like I’m in kindergarten practicing awareness and mindful breathing, and kindergarten is not a bad place to be.
Susan Fanti Spivak
Cobleskill, New York

Thank you so much for The Mindfulness Bell! I love the magazine, and it means a lot to us to get it here in Bermuda.
John Shane
Paget, Bermuda

On the morning I was to leave for the Northern California retreat with Thich Nhat Hanh last fall, my favorite human being—friend, teacher, AA sponsor—suddenly began to die. She had been sober in Alcoholics Anonymous for 13 years and, throughout that time, she had cancer and was in pain, often near death. Her courage, humility, common sense, and great compassion helped countless people, including others suffering with cancer, alcoholics trying to get sober, and even her doctors and caregivers. I am seldom as clear and centered in decision-making as I was when I gave up the opportunity to be on retreat so I could stay with my friend.

She died the next night of massive pneumonia, her body too weakened to fight it off. Her living will was eloquent and specific in expressing her view of death, and refusing to be artificially maintained beyond the moment when true recovery ceased to be possible. For me, being with my friend while she was dying was a blessing and a valuable exercise in mindfulness, in staying in the present moment.

As I sat vigil with my friend, I thought of Thich Nhat Hanh, Sister Chan Khong, and the many retreatants who were enjoying sitting and walking meditation together. The practice of mindfulness enabled me to be present during this precious time, and I am grateful to Thich Nhat Hanh for bringing these teachings into my life.

Susan McCarthy
Taos, New Mexico

Receiving The Mindfulness Bell brings me back to my true self. It enriches the quality of life for weeks and months.
Kim Cary
Massies Mill, Virginia

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Letters to The Mindfulness Bell

There isn’t anything that touches my soul more deeply than your newsletter, especially Thich Nhat Hanh’s Dharma talk. I cherish it, I carry it with me to many places, I reread it when I need to be reminded of the Way. I have read many important messages, good articles and books, but none have touched me more than Thay’s words. They have literally transformed me, although I keep working on all of the precepts. Thank you for being there and taking the effort to transmit his teachings, which are so in touch with human weaknesses.
Lorraine Keller de Schietekat
Mexico City, Mexico

I am a hospice nurse and carry a pager whenever I am away from home. Usually when I am paged I don’t get upset, but yesterday morning I was on my way to work, my pager went off and, much to my chagrin, my reaction was “!*@*!” I realized that, to the person who paged me, it was necessary and not done to annoy me. I drove back up the mountain road to my home, phoned in, took care of the  problem, and went on to work.

Issue 17 of The Mindfulness Bell was waiting for me when I got home that night. The next morning I read the tributes to Jim Fauss. I first heard of Jim when I read of his death in the last issue. I, too, was struck by his smile. I read Maxine Hong Kingston’s words, “He has an immortal smile, which he taught to the people who rode his bus. A passenger pulled the bell cord, and Jim took a joyful breath and smiled.” Those words rang a bell in my mind and I immediately thought of my reaction to my pager. I decided that my pager would become my “pager of mindfulness.” Each time it goes off I am reminded to breathe joyfully and smile. Thanks to Jim and to Maxine for sharing her story of him. I am reminded by this how interconnected we are, how we truly are a part of one another. Even though I never met Jim Fauss, I have been profoundly influenced by him and will continue to be each time my pager goes off.
Tina Moon
Eureka Springs, Arkansas

Thank you for the recent issue of The Mindfulness Bell. I especially appreciated the many articles on Jim Fauss. Although I did not know him when he was alive, I now feel that I do know him and I am enriched for the experience.
Bob Repoley
Charlotte, North Carolina

I was particularly pleased that you printed Fred Eppsteiner’s letter in the last issue, as I felt that he raised substantial questions regarding Sangha building in a genuinely kind way. I was also interested in the article in a previous issue of The Mindfulness Bell which raised the issue of finding ways to invite African Americans into the Order of Interbeing.

These invitations to dialogue will, I feel, serve The Mindfulness Bell very well in its long-term commitment to growth and to reaching a wider reading public.
Mushim Ikeda-Nash
Oakland, California

I agree with Fred Eppsteiner’s letter that longer articles, where issues could be discussed in greater depth, would make The Mindfulness Bell more interesting to a wider range of readers . In addition, I would like to see more articles on the history of Vietnamese Buddhism. This is our “ancestral tradition,” but it is virtually unknown in the West. Western Buddhism must find its own forms and expressions, but a greater knowledge of those who went before us would certainly be useful.

Fred also commented, “I sometimes wonder if anybody in the Sangha is having traditional spiritual experiences in meditation, awakenings … which have been the experience and hard-won fruits of Buddhists for thousands of years.” I think people in our Sangha do have such experiences, but they are not much talked about. This may be a good thing. In the Rinzai Zen tradition where I practiced before, one pursued such experiences relentlessly, putting a lot of pressure on people and sacrificing interest in ethics and daily life practice. This strongly goal-oriented attitude made it very hard to enjoy the present moment. Probably too much of the focus in Western Zen has been on experience, satori, sudden awakenings, etc., and we have tended to neglect the gradual practice of transforming mental knots. Thay’s teachings address all kinds of suffering-psychological, interpersonal, social, ecological- as well as the great spiritual questions.

We don’t need to create barriers between psychotherapy and meditation, but must remember that meditation has a dimension of silence and going beyond personal issues that we may rarely find in psychotherapy. Iffew people write about this aspect, it may be out of modesty-not wanting to claim “great insights”-but it may also be for lack of language! I suspect that many modern people have become alienated from the language of Christianity (and possibly Judaism), and experience it as too filled with dualistic connotations. And we don’t always know the language of Buddhism well enough to express spiritual insights. The old Chinese Zen masters were great artists when it came to giving new and fresh words to the practice and insights of Buddhism. It’s silly to copy them, but their challenge is valid: how can we express our deepest, most transforming experiences?
Svein Myreng
Oslo, Norway

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From the Editor

In the last Mindfulness Bell, Thay encouraged us to find ways to offer mindfulness as a nonsectarian practice in many settings. In this issue, practitioners share their experiences of bringing .mindfulness into schools, prisons, and hospitals; to impoverished people; and to the Earth herself. We know there are many such stories and hope to include an ongoing Social Action column in future issues. We are happy to welcome Beth Redwood as designer of The Mindfulness Bell. We hope you enjoy the clean, upbeat look of this issue, thanks to Beth.
– Leslie Rawls

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Dharma Talk: Unified Buddhist Church – Community of Mindful Living Merger

 Transcription of a Dharma Talk Given by Thich Nhat Hanh on March 2, 1999 at Plum Village Monastery, Dieulivol, France

Dear Friends, it is now the beginning of March 1999, and we are in Floating Clouds Meditation Hall, New Hamlet, Plum Village. We have just completed the Transmission of the Lamp ceremony for twelve monastics. Their training has been very steady, including a three month retreat each year. Of the twelve Dharma teachers that we ordained yesterday, many of them are very young. Most of them began practicing at the age of 22 or 23 as a monk or nun, and they have spent six or seven years practicing as monastics. Last year, the Sangha appointed 17 apprentice Dharma teachers. Out of this 17, the Sangha selected ten here in Plum Village and two in America to become this year’s ordained Dharma teachers.

Each year we will be able to produce new Dharma teachers. The plum trees are beginning to yield fruit. The procedure used to select Dharma teachers is that, rather than being nominated by Thay, they are now selected by the Sangha. It is the Sangha who has decided who will be  a Dharma teacher this year. Every year, the Sangha will appoint new apprentice Dharma teachers, and each year we will give the Lamp Transmission to a number of new Dharma teachers. We do it by way of voting. We have applied democracy to the foundation of our Sangha. One week before the Transmission of the Lamp, no one knew who would be selected to be this year’s new Dharma teachers. We prepared the ordination ceremony for the Transmission not knowing who would actually receive the Lamp and become Dharma teachers this year.

Each hamlet and each temple received instructions on how to select the Dharma teachers. I only suggested to the community how Dharma teachers should be selected using two criteria. The first is that future Dharma teachers must be people who can teach with their own life as an example and not just with words. The second criteria is that the Dharma teacher should demonstrate his or her ability to live in harmony with the Sangha and be able to take care of their younger brothers and sisters.

Everyone in the community considered these two criteria, and they were given time to meditate, to think about, and then to vote to select which apprentices met these qualifications and criteria. Thay did not have anything to do except to add up the votes and to announce the names to the community of the new Dharma teachers. All of these votes and records are in our files here. Anyone can consult them. This has been a wonderful experience, especially to see that a few Dharma teachers got a unanimous vote of the Sangha, to see that everyone thought that this person or that person is a good candidate to be a Dharma teacher. We are very happy, because of this new democratic development. We are very happy that we are now able to combine the principles of democracy and the principle of seniorship.

The training here at Plum Village and at the Green Mountain Dharma Center is very steady. It is training not just of retreats from time to time, but a training 24 hours a day for many, many years. Living together 24 hours a day, we understand and know each other very well. Therefore our judgment and our selection of Dharma teachers is based upon direct experience of each person. Living in the Sangha, we have the opportunity to try out things we have learned and to succeed or to fail. And everyone knows of and can see our success or failure.

The Transmission of the Lamp was not a big ceremony this time. We only had in attendance people who were here for our retreat. There are over 100 monastics living here and in the Green Mountain and Maple Forest Monasteries. We also have a number of laypeople who practice with us during the winter retreat.

The night of the vote and the selection of the Dharma teachers, I stayed up very late. Of course, I had my own ideas about who I thought should be the Dharma teachers and be selected this year. But I chose to practice taking refuge in the Sangha. We all have to rely on our Sangha, because we believe that the Sangha eyes are always brighter than the eyes of anyone individual, including the teacher. So I stayed up very late that night in order to count the votes. I told Sister Chan Khong that we were like being in the U.S. Congress or in the French Parliament-staying up until 2:00 or 3:00 in the morning in order to attend a meeting and make an historic vote.

You know we have three temples here, three hamlets here, and there were temples that replied very quickly and brought us their votes very quickly. But, there were also temples which took a long time to send me the results of the vote. In particular, Maple Forest Monastery took a long time. The first time, they did not understand the instructions properly. That is why they did not select according to the kind of criteria that I suggested, and we had to ask them to do it again. So it was 2:00 in the morning before I knew the names of the new Dharma teachers that had been selected. But even at that late hour, I immediately sent the names to the three temples here and the temple in Vermont at the Green Mountain Dharma Center, and I asked the abbots and abbesses to please release the results in the early morning. Of course, there were some people who were disappointed because they were not selected this year. They know that they have to begin to practice again with the Sangha in such a way that next year they will be accepted. So there will be great efforts on the part of these candidates.

I feel wonderful that this is the way we are now choosing our Dharma teachers, and this takes a lot of weight off of my shoulders. It is not Thay who decides, but the Sangha who decides. Thay of course has the right to veto, but I very rarely do. So, the community chooses, and they inform Thay of the names of the new novices and the names of the new Dharma teachers, and then Thay informs them of the date of ordination.

If the community of monks and nuns judges that a monk or nun is ripe, then they will decide and send the nomination to Thay. For the Dharma teachers, we will do it in the same way. Dharma teachers are selected and nominated by the Sangha.

Offering Guidance

I would like to talk about a very important practice here at Plum Village, the practice of offering guidance and in the principle of Sangha eyes. The Sangha eyes can see thoroughly. Many people think that the Sangha does not know, but the Sangha knows. It can see much better than you can. This practice comes directly from the tradition that on the last day of the winter retreat, the rainy season retreat, a monk should bow down in front of his brother and ask him, “Please with compassion shine light on me so that I can see my strength and my weakness during the past three months of this retreat.” He must prostrate deeply in order to receive this guidance. Here at Plum Village, we have developed it into a practice that is not only used at the end of the winter season retreat, but also, from time to time, when any of us needs the guidance of the Sangha. We can come forward and make deep prostrations and ask for guidance. Even senior teachers, like Sister Annabel Laity, come from time to time to the Sangha and prostrate, and she asks her younger sisters to shine light on her practice. Most of the people who were there, whom she bows before, are her students.

Before anyone receives full ordination, they receive guidance so they can prepare themselves for ordination, and we have seen that in only a few days, a person can make a lot of progress and undergo considerable transformation. In the beginning many people are afraid of guidance because they do not like to see their weaknesses. But everyone, after having received their guidance, has realized that this is the voice of the Buddha telling him or her how to practice, how to advance.

In the newsletter that we recently published, we printed a few letters about guidance and the experience of those who received guidance and how they practiced in order to overcome their difficulties. In Plum Village, I think we have a laboratory to try out new methods. After we have succeeded in the methods of practice, we share it with the communities outside.

One of the things we have done is to deal with attachment. For instance, when someone in the community falls in love with someone else in the community, especially in the case of a monk or nun, in the past, if the teacher and the board of teachers realized that there was this attachment on the part of a monk or nun, then that person would be expelled. They would not be allowed to stay in the monastery any more. When I was a novice, one of my fellow monks wrote two lines of poetry and gave it to a young girl down the hill from the temple. When the faculty learned about it, he was expelled from the monastery, and he went back to his lay life. I thought this was much, much too strict. He was not given the chance to begin anew and to learn. I was only 18 years old, and I saw that as a kind of injustice.

So I have been thinking about it for many years, and at Plum Village we have found many methods to help people who have gotten themselves into situations of attachment. Because we think that falling in love is an accident, you should help this person who had this accident and not kill him. It is like when a friend is struck with malaria, you have to help the person to kill the bacteria in the blood and not to kill the person.

We have been successful in dealing with this in some circumstances, and we are confident that later on we can share the method with other communities. Without the support of the Sangha, you cannot solve these problems. If I did not have a loving Sangha, I would have been expelled also. You may have read my book Cultivating the Mind of Love. In it, I tell the story of when I was a young monk, and I fell in love with a nun. It is surprising that now the mainland Chinese have chosen to translate this very book. I will be very famous in China!

Autonomy

Here in Plum Village, we have three temples: the temple we are sitting in is called “Adornment with Loving Kindness.” Each of the three temples has its autonomy. Each temple has an abbot or abbess. The office of an abbot is like being an accountant-handling accounting and bookkeeping-and each temple is free to make projects or building more dormitories, Buddha Halls, etc., and if they are short of funds and need help they can get the help from the other temples.

But, there are things that concern the whole Sangha, that need the whole Sangha to decide, and there are other things that can be resolved just in one’s own temple. Like the temple of Thay Nguyen Hai; we call it the Dharma Cloud Temple or the Upper Hamlet. They select their own head of community, they select their own treasurer, they select their own registrar, they do everything. They can decide about all these activities within the temple. But when it comes to a major decision-one that has to do with and effects the other temples-the Upper Hamlet Abbot, of course, will consult with the other abbots and abbesses.

There is only an intervention by me or by the greater Sangha of monks and nuns only when things are not going in the right direction of practice. Otherwise, each of the temples has its own autonomy, and its own independence. The schedule of the Winter Retreat is very much the same in each Hamlet, because we need to have it so in order for the three temples to join together in activities that necessitate the presence of everyone. Therefore, these decisions are made collectively. As you know, twice a week there is a Dharma talk from Thay, and everyone from every temple has to arrange it so that everyone can be present at the same time. Even the cook has the opportunity to sit in the Dharma talk, and this is possible because we work together. Here at Plum Village we do not have a special cook because everyone has the opportunity to practice mindful cooking. We always arrange our cooking in such a way that everyone has an opportunity to participate in all the activities of the Sangha.

Transfer to UBC

I would like to tell you about a night recently I had at the Hermitage. I received a fax from our lawyer, he was working on my estate plan and the tax-exemption documents for our organization in the United States. He sent me a transfer document to sign that would transfer my copyrights to the UBC, the Unified Buddhist Church. In it, he was talking about my death. He was talking in the same way that the Sutra says that death comes without warning. So, he suggested that it was better for me to sign this right away, because legally, under French law, one of my nephews or one of my nieces or some other relative could come in and claim the copyrights to my books. Instead of my copyrights being owned by the Unified Buddhist Church, which is my intention, my relatives could claim the copyrights, and that would be a pity. I would not want one of my nieces or my nephews to come in and make such a claim.

So, at 11 :00 p.m., I stayed up and signed the document and faxed it back to my attorney. It’s funny that the Dharma comes to me from lawyers, that lawyers can teach us about impermanence. Although the document was not perfect, and we have made some later revisions, the document could have been used in case that very night I passed away.

A Bell of Mindfulness

As you know, I am, in principle, a lazy monk. If you do not force me to look deeply into matters, I may not do it because there are many other things I would like to do. The day after I signed my Will, I received another document from my attorney to sign. This, as you know, was a contract that he proposed between Thay and Parallax Press so that Parallax would pay royalties to UBC for my books. I signed this document upon the urging of my estate attorney.

The following day, I received a letter from CML/Parallax Press’s attorney, Mr. Bunnin, making a counterproposal to my attorney’s contract. Reading the letter from Mr. Bunnin and reviewing the contract that I had signed, I could not sleep. Mr. Bonnin’s letter was to me a bell of mindfulness. I could not believe the tone of Mr. Bunnin’ s letter and that things could turn out this way-that I had to ask an attorney to help me, that Arnie and Therese of CML had to ask an attorney to help them; that I had to negotiate with Parallax Press and CML and Arnie, my student, and that Arnie would have to sign a contract with me.

I thought, This is so stupid. How had I allowed things to go this far. What if the younger generation looked back upon my time here and thought, What kind of teacher was Thay? He signs contracts with his disciples; he has a lawyer on his side; and his disciple has a lawyer on his side.

I could not accept this. So that night, I did not sleep. I said to myself, I must practice looking deeply into this matter. In the morning I knew what I was going to do. I realized that I was not going to sign any contract with Arnie because he and I are teacher and student; we are one. From my point of view, it is fine for me, in the name of the UBC, to sign a contract with an outside publishing house, such as Riverhead Press, Broadway Books, etc., but I knew that I could not sign a contract with Arnie or with Parallax Press.

I asked Sister Chiln Khong to please withdraw the proposal that my lawyer had written up and that I had actually signed. I felt shameful to have signed that document. I realized this was the wrong thing to do. My practice is the practice of inclusiveness. When the left hand gets hurt, the right hand comes and takes care of the wound. The left hand does not say, “I am helping you, you are the person that is getting help from me. You have to be kind to me.” No, there is no negotiation between the two hands.

If I sign a contract with my student, with my own Press and my own Community of Mindful Living, this is not in the spirit of Buddhism. We have to look in such a way to see that Arnie is Thay and Thay is Arnie and that whatever Thay does, Arnie does, and whatever Arnie does, Thay does. That is what today we beg you to understand and to help us to work with. We should do this in such a way that we can reflect a spirit of inclusiveness and nondiscrimination, so there is only continuation. This is our tradition.

We cannot say to Thay Nguyen Hai, the abbot of Upper Hamlet, we will sign a contract with you. He is the abbot, he has the right of an abbot, and he has daily work, but I do not have to sign anything with him. The Sangha does not have to sign anything with him, because the Vinaya is there, the precepts are there, the teaching is there, and there is no need of signing any contract.

As far as Thay Nguyen Hai is concerned, he practices well as a monk, as an abbot, and he does not violate any precepts. If he does not sleep with any of his female disciples, if he does not break any of the precepts, then no one can evict him from the position of the abbot. I believe we would never allow him to be evicted by anyone if he practices well as a monk and as an abbot and all other monks are helping him to do that and protecting him. So there is no need to fear anything in terms of expulsion.

The same thing is true with Sister Jina. She is not afraid of losing her abbesship. She is abbess of the Dharma Nectar Temple in the Lower Hamlet. She is actually hoping that someone can replace her so that she can travel more. She knows the Vinaya, the Mindfulness Trainings, and the daily practice is formed and created for a nun like her. We do not feel that we have to sign any agreements with Sister Jina.

The same is true with Sister Trung Chinh here, the abbess of “Adornment with Loving Kindness” and also with Sister Annabel. You have met Sister Annabel Laity in the Green Mountain Dharma Center. She is a scholar. She knows Sanskrit and Pali, and she is a scholar on Buddhism. She has been director of practice and a teacher in Plum Village for many years. She was ordained on the holy Gridakuta Mountain at the same time as Sister Chan Khong.

Between Thay and Sister Chan Duc there is something that you cannot describe; it is a perfect trust. I do not think that Sister Chan Duc has to protect herself, has to sign any agreements or contracts with me, and I think that this is thanks to the Dharma, to the Vinaya.

We are together here as a river and not as a drop of water. As a drop of
water, we cannot go far, we cannot arrive at the ocean. But, as a river, we will always arrive. So, our practice is to be a river and not a drop of water.

Here every monk, every nun, every layperson does the same and everyone contributes to the collective work to help our entire community. I cherish the presence of everyone here, even a very young novice. A novice, even if she is a novice only for three days, can already make many people happy by the way she walks, the way she sits, the way she smiles, the way she takes care of her sisters. I do not underestimate the value or contribution of even the newest person who comes to our Sangha. Our happiness comes from this, and not from any particular achievement or of such and such work.

I think that if we follow that same kind of practice and behavior, then we will be able to prevent misunderstanding and the kind of suffering that is completely useless. Then we will be able to take at least 90 percent of the burden of worrying from our shoulders.

Unification and Inclusiveness 

Who is the UBC? The UBC is all of us. The UBC is not monastics alone, because the UBC is also for the Order of Interbeing and laypeople. The UBC is for the entire Fourfold Sangha. The UBC is for every one of us.

That is why I propose that every organization, every institution that we and our friends have set up, that we all come together and adopt the same kind of attitude and procedure as are used in Maple Forest, Lotus Bud Village, Maple Village, Green Mountain Dharma Center, and the three hamlets and temples of Plum Village. That we come together as one organization, but within that organization, each one of us can keep our autonomy, just as we do here in Plum Village. We can go on as we have before, but now we can join together and gain the support of everyone in the Sangha.

Suppose this circle represents UBC (Figure 1). Before we set up the UBC in America last year, we had already set up the UBC here in France in 1969, during the war in Vietnam. Then we set up Sweet Potatoes in 1975 and then Plum Village in 1982 in France. Then, we added the  Dharma Cloud Temple and the Dharma Nectar Temple in 1988 and the Adornment with Loving Kindness Temple in 1995. And now, in 1998, we have added the Green Mountain Dharma Center in Vermont.

mb24-Unified

Each endeavor has its own authority and autonomy, but each is linked intricately to the UBC. Within the Unified Buddhist Church, we have a monastery for monks and a monastery for nuns. I drew these monastic institutions inside to show that they are monasteries only for monastics. I would like to see the Community of Mindful Living become one of the institutions that is part of ourselves, and that Parallax Press also becomes one of these institutions within the UBC.

It is my hope to transform The Mindfulness Bell into a magazine, and we may ask Leslie Rawls to continue to be editor. We can then add the support of all of us so that we can make this into a real magazine. We can send articles for it; we can invest a lot of energy in this new magazine because it can play a very important role in North America; it can help many people. In Europe, we have lntersein magazine which serves the German-speaking world. It is a beautiful magazine and lci & Maintenant, a French-language magazine, very professionally designed by a good artist in Belgium who is also a member of the Order of Interbeing. With the help of every temple, we can make The Mindfulness Bell into a real magazine, and we can ask Leslie to continue to be editor. But, we also could create an advisory board to help her, to get more news, more articles, more input. That is something that is very easy to do.

The role of Parallax Press, as in the past, remains very important. We want Parallax Press to continue and to grow. In my mind, although Arnie may have to take care of the new Great Island Center, we would wish that he also continue to be the director of Parallax Press. As the director of Parallax Press within UBC, he will be able to sign contracts not only with the United States and the English-speaking world, but also with Germany, France, Italy, everywhere, because now he will be signing in the name of the Unified Buddhist Church.

Together with other friends and advisors in the Sangha who will collaborate with him, he will publish books by Parallax Press, and he also can work together with these friends to determine which books should be published by mainstream publishing houses, such as Riverhead, Ballentine, Doubleday, and Dell and which should be published by Parallax. In this task, Arnie will be supported financially, spiritually, and technically by laypeople and monastics.

I would like to repeat what I said at the beginning, that here we try to combine the principle of seniorship and democracy. I would like to see this principle implemented at all levels of the Sangha. Because in the lay Sangha, there are many people who are very experienced in practice and in Sangha building, they should be given special status in decision-making. Because there are people who just come to practice, and they know very little about Sangha building and about the Dharma, they will not be given the same vote as a very senior member of the Sangha.

In the spirit of seniorship, each level of our Sangha will have its own boards of advisors. We will have democracy, but we would like to respect seniorship. If we can incorporate the spirit of democracy that would be a plus to the Sangha. I would like to see the same kind of practice realized in the circle of the lay Sangha as is practiced by the monastic Sangha. In the monastic community, every monk or nun is supposed to attend the Rainy Season Retreat which lasts three months. Here in Plum Village, we make the Winter Retreat the equivalent to the Rainy Season Retreat. Without participating for three months in this retreat, we would not be able to count the particular monk’s or nun’s year in assessing seniority.

In the tradition, it is written like this: five Rainy Season Retreats allow you to be a teacher; your position is equivalent to the position of a teacher; you have the right to share the Dharma after five Rainy Season Retreats. After the tenth Rainy Season Retreat, your position will be equivalent to Upadhyaya. This term refers to someone who can transmit the precepts. It was written in the Vinaya like that. But, you cannot count any year alone. A year without a three month retreat is an empty year. If you are a monk, you should be able to tell us how many Rainy Season Retreats you have done and so what your position might be. Even if you are ordained before another monk, you cannot sit on the right because we count in terms of retreats. We do not count in terms of years.

I think that the same type of practice could be applied to laypeople. You may have someone who has been ordained as an Order of Interbeing member for ten years, but during those ten years she does not recite her precepts and she does not attend any of the mindfulness retreats, and so those ten years are considered as empty. She cannot count those years in terms of seniority. That principle is already there in the tradition. You only need to apply it to your daily life. In the time of the Buddha, decision-making was only done by fully ordained monks and nuns, by the procedure called Sanghakarma.

In Plum Village, the novices and those who have been accepted into the family of monastics but are not fully ordained are consulted for every decision. We allow them to speak out and to share their insight. Then the fully ordained monastics will meet in private to make the decision. Last month, when we decided who would be nominated to receive the Dharma Lamp Transmission, we allowed the novices to vote, but after the voting, only the fully ordained monastics met in private to review and qualify the votes, because they have the ultimate right to make such decisions.

Because monastics and laypeople have to be together in order to serve the Dharma, that is why it is called the Fourfold Sangha. Although the UBC has two monasteries here, which contain only monks and nuns, we still need laypeople as friends, advisors, and practitioners. So the Fourfold Sangha is present everywhere. If we organize our entire community like this, Thay, the UBC, does not have to sign anything with Thay Nguyen Hai, and with Sister Jina and with Sister Trung Chinh, or with Arnie. We are all together as one river.

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From Sister Chan Khong

Editor’s Note: In the following two letters, Sister Chan Khong shares some ideas about implementing Thay’s vision of a unified Sangha and invites the input of the larger Sangha to help determine how this vision might be realized. Some of the advisory boards have already begun their work, but many other ideas-such as widespread use of the CML name and the establishment of a group tax exemption-have not been implemented, pending input from the Sangha and consideration of applicable law. We welcome input from the entire Sangha about these proposals.

March 31, 1999

Dear Friends,

In his Dharma Talk, Thay sets forth his vision for an inclusive and unified community. In 1974, while the war raged in Vietnam and Thay and I were exiled and living in Paris, Thay wrote his book, Zen Keys. In this book, Thay asked the question, “Is Awakening Possible?” He answered it as follows:

The problem that faces us is the problem of awakening. What we lack is not an ideology or a doctrine that will save the world. What we lack is mindfulness of what we are, of what our situation really is. We need to wake up in order to rediscover our human sovereignty. We are riding a horse that is running out of control. The way of salvation is a new culture in which human beings are encouraged to rediscover their deepest nature.

The first phase of this civilization must be to establish social conditions in which life can be lived in a human way. “Awakened” people are certainly going to form small communities where their material life will be simple and healthy, and time and energy will be devoted to spiritual concerns. These communities of mindful living will be like Zen monasteries with no dogma. In them, the sickness of the times will be cured and spiritual health will be renewed. Great art and thought will be produced.

The day following Thay’s Dharma Talk at Plum Village, a transcription of which is enclosed, the then-board of Community of Mindful Living, inspired by Thay’s vision of community inclusiveness, voted to add four monastic members to the CML Board. Thereafter, all of the nine board members of CML voted to merge CML into the Unified Buddhist Church, creating one inclusive, unified organization for our community. There were some difficulties in the process of merging, but with efforts made by everyone the good decision was ftnally achieved. The vote was unanimous.

Innovations–Inspired by the successes and innovations of numerous members of our community in bringing mindfulness practice to our society and in response to many suggestions of the Sangha, the following organizational modifications to our community are being proposed. The overall goal is to create a mindful organization that is integrated, easily understood by its members, an organization that encourages and realizes broad-based participation and a feeling of welcome, that defines the different roles and functions in the organization, and that applies consistent procedures and standards throughout all levels of our community.

Plum Village Example–It has been proposed by the Sangha that we all apply the practices used in Plum Village to all parts of the community. For example, we may consider, as Thay explains in his talk, that seniority in the monastic community is not a matter of number of years, but in time spent in defined practice sessions, for monastics, the winter retreat. Thay suggests that seniority in the lay community be viewed in this light also. Another practice used in Plum Village, which has been suggested be used in the lay community, is the use of guidance and Sangha Eyes. This is an important part of the community life here in Plum Village, and all of the Sanghas can beneftt from this practice. There are many other practices and innovations developed here at Plum Village that we would like to encourage members of all parts of the community to explore and use.

Different Elements of the Community

Sanghas or Local CML Chapters. As early as 1974, in Zen Keys, Thay was using the name Community of Mindful Living to describe the future practice communities he envisioned. It has been suggested that all local Sanghas could add the name Community of Mindful Living (CML) to their existing names. As an example, the existing Lotus Bud Sangha of Sydney Australia could now be called the Community of Mindful Living-Lotus Bud Sangha. If all Sanghas use the name, Community of Mindful Living, we become a family sharing a common name. By using the same name, CML, all Sanghas could be easily identifted, and anyone searching in the phone book, on the Internet, or in a Dharma directory, could ftnd the local CML Sangha chapter easily.

The name Community of Mindful Living is now available for all of our Sanghas to use. Also, we are applying through the Unifted Buddhist Church for recognition of an IRS taxdeductible group exemption. Each CML Sangha may beneftt from being able to receive tax-deductible donations, making sales-tax-free purchases, etc., using UBC’s tax exempt status.

It has been suggested that we encourage the creation of regional counsels of CML Sanghas so that we can have more participation and support each other. It is also suggested that a board of advisors be established to encourage and assist the growth of CML Sanghas. It is proposed that the initial board of advisors be: Therese Fitzgerald-USA, Anh Huong Nguyen-USA, Br. Phap An-Plum Village, Lyn Fine-USA, Chan Huy-Canada, and LeVan Khanh Chan Truyen-Australia.

Order of Interbeing. It has been suggested that the Order of Interbeing also have a board of advisors. The Order of Interbeing board of advisors, among other responsibilities, would deal with membership applications, review membership in good standing, and consider ways to nurture the growth of the Order of Interbeing. The Order of Interbeing board of advisors suggested for the first year is: Jack Lawlor-USA, Mitchell Ratner-USA, Larry Ward-USA, Terry Barber-USA, Sister Thoai Nghiem-Plum Village, Karl Riedl-Germany, Francoise Pottier-The Netherlands, Ha Vinh Tho-Switzerland, Elisabeth Ollagnier-France, and Chan Luong-Australia.

Dharma Teachers. It has been suggested that a board of advisors be established to assist Dharma teachers. This advisory board would support Dharma teachers in their quality of practice, Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings, and practice retreats. The board of advisors suggested for the ftrst year is: Sister Annabel-(GMDC) USA, Chan Hoi-Canada, Thay Giac Thanh-(MFM) USA, and Karl Schmied-Germany.

Mindfulness Bell. Thay envisions this publication becoming a worldwide Buddhist magazine with all parts of the community, Dharma centers, monasteries, CML Sanghas, mindfulness practice centers, mindfulness training institutions, laypeople, and monastics all contributing their insight and understanding. It is envisioned as an edited collection of articles written by and about all the different parts of the community and the Dharma and being a catalyst to create great art and thought, as Thay discussed in Zen Keys.

This publication, now edited by Leslie Rawls, could become an even more vibrant aspect of our community, and all members are encouraged to write and their submitted work is welcome. The board of advisors for the ftrst year is suggested to be: Richard Brady-USA, Jerry Braza-USA, Helga Riedl-Germany, Sister Jina-Plum Village, Ann Johnston-USA, Hoang Khoi-Australia, Mai Chan My-United Kingdom, and Eveline Beumkes-Holland.

Parallax Press. Headed by Arnie Kotler, Parallax Press will now have all our book publishing operations, both national and international, under its direction. It will also be expanded to include not only publishing but also all marketing of the intellectual property rights to Thay’s works recently transferred to the ownership of the UBC. We envision this Press as a strong, growing institution of our community. Its board of advisors, suggested for the fIrst year, is: Michael Rosenbush-France, Sister Huong Nghiem-GMDC, Sister Thuc Nghiem-GMDC, and Nguyen Ba Thu Chan Tri-USA.

Central Communication System. Using the existing CML webpage and a new 1-800 number, we would like to establish a comprehensive directory system for all CML Sanghas, Green Mountain Dharma Center, Mindfulness Practice Centers, the UnifIed Buddhist Church, Parallax Press, Plum Village, Maple Forest Monastery, Maple Village, The Mindfulness Bell, etc.

Future Years

The members of these advisory boards are unpaid volunteers. Of course, the paid staff employees of the various parts of the community, such as Parallax Press, The Mindfulness Bell, and the Order of Interbeing will have significant input into the decision-making process.

The above advisory board members are to be nominated for the fIrst year only. After the fIrst year, the community itself will decide whom to have on its boards of advisors. The entire community will be consulted by using the combination of democracy and seniorship outlined by Thay.

These proposed organizational innovations are inspired by Thay’s recent Dharma Talk and will bring in many new voices to the decision-making processes of our community. All of us, as individual drops of water, are joining together as one river flowing to the sea.

Yours in the Dharma,
Sister Chan Khong


Plum Village, the 250th day before the year 2000. April26, 1999

Dear friends,

Thay is very happy that the invitation of more participants and input contained in my letter of April 4, 1999 to all of you has borne fruit. We welcome and are grateful for your suggestions made over the past few weeks. The receipt of these contributions has encouraged us improve even more energetically on the path of broad based community decision making.

Thay is a generous teacher who has offered his guidance on how our community should be organized so that everyone may feel included and that his or her contribution is valued. Thay always listens to his Sangha. Together, we can carefully consider matters and our collective insight will bring forth well being of the entire Sangha.

We have proposed thirty members to be advisors. Initially. these advisors were chosen to give the broadest representation geographically from many continents and countries. speaking many languages and including laymen, laywomen, nuns, and monks. We are looking forward to expanding this core group over the next twelve months as the community determines. We wish that the various boards of advisors for The Mindfulness Bell, the Order Of Interbeing, Parallax Press, and CML will soon start to make plans to meet and discuss how to give more inspiration and encouragement to each part of the Sangha Body.Please do not wait, go ahead as a Sangha to discuss and to give new fresh air to that part of the Sangha where we suggested you put your energy. Even if your name is not on the board of advisors of that branch of the Sangha body, just contact those on the board and give your insight. We are listening carefully to the advice of our Sangha members who are attorneys about tax exemption at the local level, and will consider with you again before acting. Thank you.

We are pleased to inform you that as I write this letter, the board of advisors for Parallax Press has traveled to and has already spent many days in Berkeley, to work with Arnie and the staff of Parallax Press. Thay is very happy that so many members of the community are now contributing and that his students feel encouraged to contribute even more. With the maturity of practice and spiritual growth of so many of his lay students, Thay has decided that soon he will transmit the Lamp to many new lay Dharma teachers.

We need your input and help to make a True Sangha Body. We write to you with love and trust in the deep insights of the stream of our spiritual teachers existing in each of you and we wait to hear from you.

We believe strongly that this merger of two arms of Thay in the United States of America (UBC and CML) and the enlarging of the Sangha Body is the will of our spiritual ancestors but not from Thay only.When conditions are sufficient, where the merits of those who have received and who will receive this teaching are sufficient, deep energies push and things should be realized have been realized without premeditating. It comes out finally and helps everyone go in the direction of beauty.

Please continue to share your wisdom with us.

A wonderful green spring to you, a renewed fresh Sangha member,

Chan Khong True Emptiness Bare Feet

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Letters to The Mindfulness Bell

What a delight it is to see The Mindfulness Bell in the mail! This journal is truly a bell, as the articles in it bring me back to my practice and my true self. I am new to formal Buddhism, but everything I read and hear seems to resonate with my own ideas, and waters fascinating seeds. I so enjoy knowing that there is a community here which sees life and our role within it similarly to the way I do. I am grateful to all who share the experience of their practice-especially those willing to relive painful memories-so as to remind me to come home and continue my practice. It often takes me quite a while to read The Bell, as many bits inspire a period of meditation. I look forward to the next issue, but keep savoring the old ones as well.

Cherry Zimmer
Duluth, Georgia

I am currently using the Sutra on Full Awareness of Breathing (Anapanasati Sutra) as a guide for sitting meditation practice, with the help of Thay’s book, Breathe! You Are Alive and also the book, Breath by Breath: The Liberating Power of Insight Meditation. My intention is to practice each of the sixteen exercises in a systematic way. If there are others also practicing this way, and interested in sharing the practice, please contact me.

David Flint
True Good Nature
311 W. 97 St., 6E
NY, NY 10025
DFlint@MSN.com

Thank you for explicitly addressing the topics of racism and diversity in mindfulness practice in the April 1998 issue of The Mindfulness Bell. It was wonderful to read articles on “Unlearning Racism,” “Diversity and Unity,” and “Coming Out, Returning Home.” Articles like these will not only broaden the base of Buddhism in America, they will deepen the practice of people who are already striving to cultivate mindfulness.

Scott PIous
by email

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Poem: Teacher, Teacher

mb25-TeacherChildren, the Great Consciousness in its myriad forms. May I honor each one as we work together.

I enter a room filled with small eager beings
busy with things to see, learn, do.
It’s kindergarten class, and I’m the guest
teacher

Suddenly there’s a tap on my leg,
a tug on my sleeve,
so many touches at once,

I can’t think.

I want to stop these pawing hands, these voices,
voices, voices.
The world that clamors for my attention.

“Teacher, teacher, see I can write my name.”
“Teacher, teacher, look at the building we
made.”
“Teacher, teacher, listen to the story I wrote.”

“Calm yourself,” I mutter, “these are only little
kids.”
But their never-ending touches drive my nerve
endings to the edge of sanity.

“Teacher, teacher, do you like my picture?”
“Teacher, teacher, I catched the ball three
times.”
“Teacher, teacher, listen to the song I know.”

I look down
noses taking the breath of life,
mouths excited with the formation of words,
skin luminescent with newness
hair carefully braided, hair straggly and
brittle,
eyes all shades, large and luminous, deep and
dark,
clear blue, hazel, gray, brown, black, open.

Hands holding a picture—
“Special, for you teacher.”
the voice soft as milkweed about to fly off on the
wind.

“Teacher, teacher, see, I sharpened the pencil all by
myself.”
“Teacher, teacher, look at the puzzle I
finished.”
“Teacher, teacher, I can count to 100.”

I am looking into the soul of the universe
the Great Consciousness
fresh from its source.

I breathe in once, twice, three times.
Now the tapping feels like gentle waves lapping
my thigh,
Fall leaves brushing against me as I walk.
Buddha nature, present, visible, vibrant.

“Teacher, teacher, see how high I can jump.”
“Teacher, teacher, look, I put everything away.”
“Teacher, teacher, read me this story.”

And suddenly, “teacher, teacher” is my bell of
mindfulness.

I turn.
On the edge of class a child sits, eyes clouded, face
tight, lips pulled.
So soon?
I walk over, the child shrinks into himself.
The Great Source in pain.
“You are beautiful, special,” I whisper in passing,
“I’m glad you’re here.”

Oh, that I could be open and compassionate all day
long.
That I didn’t slip,
wasn’t short,
never used a sharp voice.

But the children help.
“Teacher, teacher,” they say,
and the mindfulness bell rings again.

“Teacher, teacher, I cut good with my scissors,
don’t I?”
“Teacher, teacher, please tie my shoe.”
“Teacher, teacher, I like you.”

Diane L. Ste. Marie
Seattle, Washington, USA

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Letters to the Mindfulness Bell

The Spring issue of The Mindfulness Bell, dedicated to Sangha Dynamics, prompted me to write and share an endeavor that has enriched our Sangha family. Several months ago, I read Learning True Love by Sister Chan Khong, and was totally moved by the work she does. I decided to write her at the address in the back of the book to find out how I could sponsor a child or student. Her response was a report which she had prepared for her various supporters. From this report I learned that $5.00 U.S. per month buys rice for a poor orphaned child, a toddler staying for lunch in the local day care, a handicapped person, an elderly person, or a young college or university student. Ten U.S. dollars a month provides a young person over the age of fifteen with vocational training. When I realized how much could be done with so little, I decided to share the information with my Sangha. They were equally enthused, and we decided to prepare a donation box to set out each week when we meet. Now we look forward to emptying the box at the end of each month, and writing a check for our extended family in Vietnam.

In July, four of my Sangha family visited the Green Mountain Dharma Center in Vermont. There they learned of Sister Chan Hy Nghiem’s recent trip to Vietnam and saw videos of food and packages being delivered to the poor. They saw the excitement and appreciation of those we help and returned to Sangha filled with gratitude and further resolve. They also shared with us a sponsorship program emanating from the Dharma Center. This program makes it possible to sponsor a specific child, toddler, student, handicapped, or elderly person for just $60 (U.S.) per year, and to be in touch directly with that person. A sponsor form and information about this program can be obtained from the UBC Relief Committee, Attn.: Sister Chan Hy Nghiem, P.O. Box 182, Hartland-Four Corners, VT 05049, USA.

Our Sangha family has benefitted both individually and collectively by developing our compassion through the understanding that other people’s suffering is greater than our own. Perhaps other Sanghas would also benefit from sharing in this way.

Marian Gable
Elberson, Pennsylvania, USA

Thank you so much for the helpful magazine. I find Thay’s Dharma talks especially helpful. It is important to read how others are integrating mindfulness practice into their lives. Reading The Mindfulness Bell is like tapping into the larger Sangha.

Lynda Schaller
Gay Mills, Wisconsin, USA

mb25-Letters

I enjoyed the latest issue of The Mindfulness Bell very much. The contributions on Sangha practice reverberate with lots of common issues. I am pleased to see the greater Sangha finally entering a new phase of practice—touching and dealing with real difficulties. Nothing beats “Sangha eyes.”

Khanh Le Van
Sydney, Australia

I have a concern about The Mindfulness Bell. The last few issues have read to me sort of like “how-to” manuals for mindfulness practice. I’m sure they are useful when everyone is trying to figure out how to “make Sanghas work,” but I miss very much the old style where there seemed to be many more articles by individuals simply sharing their practice in a great variety of situations. I find those articles so inspiring, so vital, and so enlivening. The variety was a big part of vitality of the mix.

Perhaps Thay’s notion of a magazine will be the inspiration we need to really express the very dynamic mix of democratic and elder-oriented [elements] in our governing and decision-making. I hope in our publishing practices as well, we will honor the creative forces of the individual as he approaches the living mystery of life with awareness and conscience.

Katharine Cook
California, USA

Thank you for the beautiful work you do for us all in producing The Mindfulness Bell. We will be using much of the most recent edition [Sangha Dynamics, issue no. 24] for a Sangha-building retreat here in Adelaide. May you be well loved.

Peter Hawkins
Adelaide, Australia

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Leaving a Legacy of Love and Compassion

An Interview with Brandy Sacks

mb61-LegacyMindfulness Bell: Brandy, where did you grow up and what were your first religious experiences?

Brandy Sacks: I’ve lived all my adult life in San Diego, California. My parents were non-practicing Jews, and I really wasn’t raised with any spirituality. As I grew up, however, I was attracted to Buddhism, but most of what I saw here in California was Japanese Zen practice. The Zen Center in San Francisco was very prominent. Japanese Zen really didn’t click for me; it seemed too strict, with too many rules. I did, however, become a Reiki Master. 

MB: How did you first encounter the teachings of Thich Nhat Hanh? 

BS: I first became aware of Thich Nhat Hanh through my Reiki teacher, who would quote from Thay’s writings and talks. In 1993, I heard Thay was coming to Malibu to lead a Day of Mindfulness. It was one of his earliest retreats on the West Coast; there was no Sangha in Los Angeles or San Diego at the time, and we might get a hundred people for a multi-day retreat, several hundred for a one-day event—much smaller than now. I went to the ‘93 Day of Mindfulness. 

MB: Obviously it was a life-changing experience. 

BS: It was. What really resonated for me were the Five Mindfulness Trainings, Thay’s vision for a global spirituality and ethic: reverence for life, true happiness, true love, loving speech and deep listening, and nourishment and healing. They were clear, direct, but not ten commandments. We weren’t striving for perfection, but by following these trainings we could become happier. That really made sense to me. I wanted a spiritual practice that emphasized happiness. So I took the Five Mindfulness Trainings at that retreat. 

MB: Where did you go from there? 

BS: I began reading Thay’s books and continued my sitting here on the West Coast. Then I heard he was coming in 1997 to lead a multi-day retreat in Santa Barbara. We had a huge turnout. People still talk about that one and the one that followed in 1999 as solidifying the West Coast community.

There was still no San Diego Sangha in 1997, but after the retreat there was a lot of talk about Sangha building. Thay stressed that if you wanted to become a member of the Order of Interbeing you had to lead or start a Sangha. About the same time, Christopher Reed, a lay Dharma teacher, started a meditation class that became the first San Diego Sangha. We later moved to the Wat Lau Temple for the Sangha’s meetings and I began leading it. I took the Fourteen Mindfulness Trainings at the retreat in 1999. 

MB: How has your personal commitment to Buddhism influenced your professional career? 

BS: I was an elementary school teacher for a number of years. Later I became the manager of operations for a nonprofit called Bread for the Journey. I currently work for another nonprofit, GroundSpark, which uses documentary filmmaking to ignite social change. It’s a great organization and won an Academy Award in 1991 for Deadly Deception, its documentary film on the environmental and health dangers of creating nuclear weapons. Our current project is called Respect for All, a series of films aimed at elementary, middle, and high school audiences on respecting diversity. The middle school films focus quite a bit on stopping bullying; the high school films deal with bullying, sexuality, and other issues.

Around 2001, once the Community of Mindful Living office in Berkeley closed, I took over running the iamhome.org website. The website featured, as its successor still does, an international Sangha directory and a listing of retreats and talks by Thay.  After five or six years I appealed to Janelle Combelic, then editor of the Mindfulness Bell magazine, for assistance with content and direction for the website. We got together a small team of OI members, Dharma teachers, and monastics. We decided to broaden the focus of the website to include the online version of the Mindfulness Bell magazine. We changed the name to mindfulnessbell.org and I’ve been webmaster ever since. 

MB: You’ve been engaged in this practice now for almost twenty years. Looking back, what has it meant for you? 

BS: I’m very dedicated to the Five Mindfulness Trainings and once every six weeks I lead a recitation at our Sangha. They remain for me one of the most concrete and real aspects of our practice and underlie all Thay says in his books and all we do.

Looking back, I’m a lot happier, a lot less anxious and fearful, a lot more compassionate and caring. I got ninety percent of that from the practice. It helped me realize and stay mindful of the impact that my words and actions have on those around me. As Thay says, it’s not just about you, it’s about the community of family, friends, and colleagues around you, about the whole world, really, and the impact you have on it, moment to moment.

Thay talks about not turning away from suffering. That’s a continuing challenge for me, but I draw strength from his encouragement to have solidity, be mindful, be content and happy in myself so I have the energy and inner resources to look at the suffering in the world. It’s inspired me to have a career devoted to helping others. 

MB: And because of all this, you’ve decided to leave half of your estate to furthering the work Thay has begun. 

BS: Yes! As soon as I heard that the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation had been created, I decided making a planned gift was a really good thing to do. Planned gifts are going to be essential to helping the monastic and lay communities continue to grow and thrive. Many of us want to ensure that the teachings and the monastic order continue in the future, but we may not have the wealth to make a major gift at the present moment. That makes planned giving an attractive option: if you’ve got a retirement plan, you have assets that you can give after your lifetime.  All it takes is filling out a codicil to your will, and changing your beneficiaries if you have a retirement plan, which is what I did. It’s very easy to do.

mb61-Legacy2How to Leave a Legacy of Love and Compassion

You can leave a legacy of love for our beloved teacher, Thich Nhat Hanh, and his inspirational work around the world by making a bequest gift to the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation. Your bequest allows the Sangha to care for our U.S. monastic practice centers, support worldwide humanitarian efforts, and promote programs that bring the practice of mindfulness into schools. Your gift transforms suffering into compassion—bringing peace and joy to millions around the world.

What is legacy giving or planned giving?

A legacy or planned gift is a gift that a donor decides to make available at some future date. Through your will, you can make a generous gift that might not be possible during your lifetime—and have a huge impact on continuing to spread mindfulness and peace around the world.

Who can make a bequest?

Anyone can make a bequest. You do not need to be wealthy; it does not cost a thing, and if you change your mind at any time, you can simply alter your will.

Is it possible to make a gift through my will, and do you want a gift like this?

Yes. A bequest is the most common type of legacy gift and is often the easiest way to make a significant contribution toward the continuation of Thich Nhat Hanh’s teachings of mindfulness and peace around the world. The suggested language below can help you and your advisors include us in your will or other estate-planning documents.

May I designate my gift for a specific purpose or practice center?

Yes. Your gift may be designated for any program or practice center supported by the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation. We would be happy to review your designation options with you.

Is it possible to name the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation as a beneficiary of my retirement plan?

Yes. Leaving a retirement plan or IRA (or a portion of it) is a tax-wise gift because you will avoid all estate and income taxes on the plan assets after your lifetime (or at the death of the survivor of you and your spouse). To make this gift, you simply notify your plan’s administrator of your wish to change the beneficiary. A “change of beneficiary” form will be required. The Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation can be designated as a full or partial beneficiary of your plan.

Can I use my life insurance policy to benefit the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation?

Yes. You can name the Foundation as a primary, partial, or alternate beneficiary of your life insurance policy by filling out a change of beneficiary form with the insurance company. Furthermore, if you no longer need the policy proceeds in your estate, you can transfer ownership of the policy to the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation.

What if I already have a will and I want to make a bequest to the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation?

Generally, you would not need to rewrite your will, but you could create a sort of amendment called a codicil. It is very important to consult a lawyer where you live, so your codicil complies with local laws that will govern your estate.

The beneficiary should be designated as Trustees of the Unified Buddhist Church, a Vermont charitable corporation, tax identification number 03-0356845, (“UBC”), and if you like, you may designate that UBC shall use this gift: (examples)… at the discretion of the TNH Continuation and Legacy Foundation Board of Directors… for Blue Cliff Monastery… for Deer Park Monastery… for Magnolia Grove Monastery.

Whom should I consult about making a planned gift?

You may consult attorneys who practice estate planning, accountants, financial planners, trust officers, insurance agents, stockbrockers, and/or any professional advisor you know and trust who has knowledge about planned giving.

Your will is your legacy of love. Please take a moment to breathe and experience the joy of compassionate giving through a bequest gift that ensures the continuation of Thay’s work. We bow in gratitude for your compassionate heart and would be honored and grateful to be notified of your bequest intentions.

For more information on including the Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation and Unified Buddhist Church in your bequest gift or estate plans, please contact:

Community Liaison, Lorri Houston
Thich Nhat Hanh Continuation and Legacy Foundation
2499 Melru Lane
Escondido, CA 92026
Phone: 760-291-1003 ext. 104
Email:   Info@ThichNhatHanhFoundation.org
Website:  ThichNhatHanhFoundation.org
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