Home is the Way – A Christmas message from Thầy

Christmas time is a time for the family, when family members return to their home. Wherever we may be, we try to find a way home to be with our family. It is like the Tết holiday in the Vietnamese culture. We decorate our house and find ways to make our home warm and cozy. We all yearn to have a home that is warm and loving; where we feel that we do not need to go anywhere, or to do or to pursue anything anymore. It is what we can call our ‘true home’. We all have this yearning, this deep desire to be in our true home.

Searching for our home
Jesus, as soon as he was born, had to be on the run right away and to be a refugee, a runaway without a home. When he grew up and became a young man, it was the same; he was still a wanderer with no real home to return to. In one of his discourses, he protested that even the birds have their nests to return to or the rabbits and squirrels have their burrows; but the Son of Man has no place to lay his head, no place to call home.

Siddhartha, as an adult, found himself in a similar situation. He was born into a royal family that was wealthy and privileged. He could have anything he desired. He had a beautiful wife and a good son. He had a bright future ahead of him; destined to be king and ruler of a great empire. But still, he did not feel comfortable even with all this. He did not feel at home. He was not at peace. Therefore, one day, he decided to leave his family in search of his true home, in search of inner peace.

Both Jesus and Siddhartha were searching for their true home. They wanted to find a warm abode where they would not have to search for anything anymore and where they would feel truly at home and at peace. Western people have a saying, “There is no place like home” that expresses the feeling that there is nothing like coming home after being away. Yet still, some of us do not feel at home, do not feel that we have a home to return to, even in our own families. It is because in our families, there is not enough warmth, not enough love, ease, peace or happiness.

Some of us have a homeland, living in the country where we were born, yet we still want to escape and go somewhere else. We feel like we do not have a homeland. Some Jewish people feel that they still do not have a homeland. They have been wandering and searching for a homeland for thousands of years – for a place, a piece of land to call home. Even to this day they have yet to find their homeland. And we – the French, the Americans, the British, and the Vietnamese  – we all have a country to call our homeland, but still, we do not feel contented and some of us want to leave. This is because we have not found our true home in our heart. This season, even if we buy a Christmas tree to decorate our home, this does not necessarily mean that we have found our true home or that we are at ease living in our homeland. For our home to be true, there needs to be love, warmth, and fulfillment.

Our True Home
In the end, Jesus found his true home in his heart. He found the light in his heart. He taught his disciples that they too have their own light and he taught them to bring that light out for others to see. Siddhartha taught that one’s true home can be found in the present moment. He developed practices for his disciples so that they too could find their true home. He taught that we each have an island within that is safe and secure. If we know how to return to this island, we can be in touch with our blood and spiritual ancestors, with the wonders of life, and with our own self. In the island of our true self, we can find peace and fulfillment.

Siddhartha found his true home and wanted everyone to be able to find their true home. When the Buddha was in his 80th year and knew that he would soon pass from this life, he felt a lot of compassion for his disciples and friends because he saw that many of them had not found their true home. He knew that when the time came for their teacher to pass away, they would feel abandoned and at a loss. At that time, he was practicing the Rains Retreat, residing outside of the city of Vaishali, north of the Ganges. He became very sick during that season. The Buddha’s attendant, Venerable Ananda thought his teacher would soon pass away, so he went into the forest behind some trees to weep. But the Buddha used his power of concentration to slow the progress of his illness and to find the strength to live for a few more weeks, so that he could return to his homeland, Kapilavastu, and pass away peacefully.

The Island Within
At the end of that Rains Retreat season, the Buddha went into the city of Vaishali to visit his disciples, the monks and nuns and the lay friends in the Sangha. Wherever he visited, he would give a short talk for about 5-7 minutes – a mini dharma talk. These mini talks were usually centered on the topic of ‘true home’. He felt that after he had passed on, there would be many disciples who would be at a loss. The Buddha taught them that they all had a place of refuge to return to and that they should take refuge only there.

We too, should return and take refuge in that abode and not take refuge in any other person or thing. That abode of refuge is the ‘Island of Self’; it is the Dharma, and there, one can find peace and protection; one can find our ancestors and our roots. This is our true home – our inner island where there is the light of the true Dharma. Returning there, one finds light, one finds peace and safety, and one is protected from the darkness. The ‘Island of Self’ is a safe place of refuge from the turbulent waves that can otherwise sweep us away. Taking refuge in this island within is a very important practice.

We have a song in Plum Village titled, ‘Being an Island unto Oneself’. This song is about the practice of taking refuge in oneself. If we still feel that we have not found our true home, that we do not have a place to call home, that we have not truly come home, that we still want to look for a homeland, or that we still feel lonely and at a loss; then this practice is for us. This song can remind us to return and take refuge in the island within.

Our Refuge of Practice
Around the 4th or 5th century, when these mini talks were translated into Chinese, the monks translated the ‘Island of Self’ as ‘tự châu’ (tự is self and châu is island). “Dear monks, practice being islands unto yourselves, knowing how to take refuge in yourselves.” Those were the words the Buddha uttered just one month before he had passed away. If we consider ourselves to be soul mates of the Buddha, to be real students of the Buddha, we should take his advice and not go looking for our homeland, our true home, in time and space. We should look for this true home right within our own self, within our own heart; where there is everything we are searching for. There, we can touch our ancestors, blood and spiritual, and touch our roots, our heritage. There, we can find peace and stability. There, we can find the light of wisdom. Let us take refuge in our own island – in the island of the Dharma. We do not take refuge in any other person or thing, even Thầy.

The Buddha’s love is immense. He knew that there would be many students who would feel lost after he had gone, so he reminded them that his body was not something permanent and eternal. He taught them that that which was most worthy for them to take refuge in, was their own island of self. We know that it is always there for us. We do not have to take the plane or the bus or the train to go there, but with our mindful breathing and mindful steps, we can be there right away. Our island within is our true refuge. It is our practice of the Dharma.

This Christmas, if you buy and bring home a Christmas tree to decorate, remember that your ‘True Home’ is not found outside yourself, but it is right in your own heart. We do not need to bring home anything for us to feel fulfilled. We have everything we need right in our heart. We do not need to practice for many years or to travel far to arrive at our true home. If we know how to generate the energy of mindfulness and concentration, then with each breath, with each step, we arrive at our true home. Our true home is not a place far removed from us in space and time. It is not something that we can buy. Our true home is present right in the here and now; if only we know how to return and to be truly present to it.

Home in the Present Moment
The other day, Thầy was reflecting on what message to send to his friends and students abroad so that they can practice, so that they can be like Jesus or be like the Buddha. Thầy then wrote this calligraphy: “There is no way home, Home is the way.”

The means and the ends are not two separate things. There is no way to return to our home. Our home is the way. Once we take a step on that path home, we are home right in that moment. This is true to the practice of Plum Village. There is no way to happiness, Happiness is the way. Recently, Thầy also shared in his Dharma Talk that, There is no way to nirvana, Nirvana is the way. Every breath and every step has the capacity to bring us right back to our true home, right in the here and now. This is the fundamental practice of Plum Village. This is the message that Thầy wants to send to his friends and students during this Christmas season. If you want to send a Holiday greeting to your friends and loved ones, you can also send this message. If you can practice it truly, then sending it will have a deep meaning; but if you do not practice it, then the message will have little substance.

Let us all enjoy our practice of coming home this Holiday season. Let us truly be at home within, and so become a home for our loved ones and all our friends.

With trust and love,

Thầy

 

15 thoughts on “Home is the Way – A Christmas message from Thầy

  1. What solace this message brings to my momentary phase of searching – searching for fulfillment, for love to come to me from outside, from my estranged children. I remind myself that this is my need, not their need. As a loving father, I remind myself that it is my children’s need that must be foremost in priority, not mine. And Thay reminds me in this nurturing message that solace and love are within me. It is for me to touch my solace within, my love within….through Mindful contemplation…..whenever I wander.
    A lotus for Thay,
    Felix

  2. I appreciate and respect Thay’s Christmas message. But like many, maybe all “Christmas Greetings” as such they cannot completely express the immense complexity of human life, and the peace and understanding we all want but do not necessarily achieve in the sense of a permanent true home, of course everything is impermanent. So I think the best, truest, most clarifying, and powerful thing about his message is in the calligraphy: “There is no way home, Home is the way, There is no way to happiness, Happiness is the way.”
    The constant attention, concentration, and practice in the present that carries over into everything we do. That surely is the “Way,” the way of Dharma.

  3. Thank you Thay for your Christmas message i love the fact that your words are always simple and consistent the message always the same oh that we do our best to remember to follow it. i suppose as a Christian i feel sorry i hadnt really reflected on Jesus always on the move spreading his message and teachings and how lonely he must have felt sometimes so thank you again for helping me to stop and consider this as it helps to stay close to Jesus by knowing he walked this planet and used his suffering to help others.

  4. As an exile, I too have found that home is in my heart. These last few days my practice has been (as soon as I awake): “peace to one and all, peace on earth”. It brings ME back to an inner island of peace and I feel ready to face the day, despite difficulties which may arise. Our thoughts are so important, and Thay is always my teacher in living wisdom. Blessings.

  5. Thank you for the message of ‘home and mindfulness’ given this season’s time of family and friends. When one is reminded of ‘the practice of mindfulness,’ one realizes to be home with oneself with love and kindness. Love…peace.. and happiness…dani flores

  6. Dear Thay, Your Christmas message is so simple and yet, as always, so profound. Finding peace in the world starts with finding peace within ourselves. Finding that true quite place within us… our true home.
    You remind us it is always there. Thank you for your teaching. May we all carry this deep awareness with us wherever we go. Merry Christmas, dear Thay. You have touched my heart so deeply.
    I hold much gratitude and love for you.
    Sue

  7. Thank you Dear Thay for your wonderful light. This light is deep inside us right now and your message makes it shine brighter even if it is poignant to think of those who are or will no longer be there to rekindle it. We can be that transforming flame.

  8. Dear Thay and Dharma Friends, For the first year, my British husband and I are spending winter in Florida because of my lungs. We are learning to be at home in the land of palm trees, cranes, shore birds. They are all new to us, yet we are spending the holidays taking each day to experience what we need to do to care for our increasingly fragile bodies, and to be available to support my daughter, and to support my family and our President in his stressful times. Home for us is being true to dharma, ourselves, our values and love for family. We are beginning to include tropical plants around us, as well as friends in the music and dance communities, and those who do yoga on the beach at sunset. Home grows itself where we are if we provide the nutrients. Hannah S Wilder, True Good Heart

  9. Regarding type O………
    My intentions were as this. I believe God and Buddha are Brothers.They are perfection that cannot be captured by anyone.Both are within us. Thank you, a lotus for all @—}}}——————

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