The Eight Practices of Respect —Gurudharmas

For a bhikshu to practice with regard to a bhikshuni By Thich Nhat Hanh

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  1. A bhikshu should join his palms in greeting when he sees a bhikshuni join her palms to him, even though that bhikshuni has only been ordained as bhikshuni for a short time. A bhikshuni, no matter how long she has been ordained, represents the whole bhikshuni Sangha, which has been a partner of the bhikshu Sangha from the time it began to exist and will continue to be so in the future.
  2. A bhikshu does not think or say that the karmic retribution of a nun is less favourable than that of a monk and for that reason a bhikshuni’s studies, practice, realizations and  service to the  Buddhadharma cannot equal that of the bhikshu. A bhikshu is aware that the reason why the Pratimoksha for bhikshunis has more precepts than that for bhikshus is not because bhikshunis have a less favourable karmic retribution: it is because the nuns themselves established more precepts for self-protection and the protection of monks and laymen.
  3. When a bhikshu sees a bhikshuni he should be aware of whether she is of the same age as his mother, elder sister, younger sister, or daughter might be. He should feel respect for and want to protect and assist in the practice any bhikshuni who is older than him as he would feel respect for and want to protect his mother and elder sister. If the bhikshuni is younger than him he should feel care and concern for her and want to protect and assist her in the practice as he would feel concern for his younger sister or daughter.
  4. A bhikshu never maligns a bhikshuni, even in a roundabout way. He never hits a bhikshuni even with a flower. It is courteous of a bhikshu of the twenty-first century to offer a cup of tea to a bhikshuni. A bhikshu knows that just as the bodhisattva Samantabhadra is found in the person of the true bhikshu, so the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara is found in the person of the true bhikshuni. This knowledge fosters mutual respect.
  5. When organizing the three-month Rains’ Retreat, bhikshus should make sure that it is in a place where there is a bhikshuni Sangha, so that the bhikshus have an opportunity to be near to, offer teaching to, and receive the support of the bhikshuni Sangha, because the bhikshuni Sangha always has and will be a partner of the bhikshu Sangha.
  6. When the bhikshus hear about a bhikshuni who is learned in the Dharma, is skilled in sharing the Dharma, and practices well the precepts and all other aspects of the path, they can contact the bhikshuni Sangha and invite that bhikshuni to come and give teachings and share her understanding and experience of the practice with them.
  7. When bhikshunis volunteer to come to the bhikshu monastery in order to help cook and lay out a celebratory meal at a memorial service or other important ceremony, the bhikshus should find ways to help out and work alongside the bhikshunis, especially in lifting heavy items.
  8. When bhikshus hear that a bhikshuni is in ill-health or has had an accident they should express feelings of sympathy and they can delegate bhikshus to visit her, ask after her health and find other ways to offer support.

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